ARcade » Ovum http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/arcade Weblog maintained by Hill+Knowlton Strategies\' global Analyst Relations team. Wed, 30 Nov 2011 02:40:13 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.2 en hourly 1 Analysts can’t have all the fun… http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/arcade/2009/11/20/analysts-can%e2%80%99t-have-all-the-fun%e2%80%a6/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/arcade/2009/11/20/analysts-can%e2%80%99t-have-all-the-fun%e2%80%a6/#comments Fri, 20 Nov 2009 19:56:37 +0000 Kevin Fong http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/arcade/?p=133 In late October 2009, one of my clients held its first Investor Day in years, and H&K was right in the thick of scheduling, planning and supporting the much-anticipated event. The day marked my first time witnessing an Investor Day firsthand, and more importantly, the day’s events gave me a glimpse into what it’s like to walk in an analyst’s shoes for a day.

Both financial analysts and industry analysts were invited to the two-day event on-site and at a nearby hotel. H&K supported AR efforts during the event, overseeing the analyst roundtables and accompanying the 25 industry analyst that attended the show, including key business watchers from Gartner, Forrester, IDC, Ovum, Yankee and CCS Insights.

A cocktail reception the night prior to the Investor Day was held at the company’s headquarters, which allowed me the rare opportunity to meet analysts I’ve only ever spoken to over the phone. What an experience it was to finally put a face to a name I’ve seen on bylines of research reports and whose bios I’ve read to the point of memorization. While meeting through face-to-face interactions is essential to building strong analyst relationships, many often settle for periodic phone calls and exchanging long email chains. I took advantage of the chance to check out the various product demos, ask detailed questions to the execs, and helped myself to the catered food at the event. After tasting the first bite of lamb shank, I began to think analyst life wasn’t half bad after all.

The following day, the Investor Day presentations took place at a local swanky hotel. Executive roundtables for industry analysts followed the general session allowing analysts to get a deeper dive into their research areas with business unit executives. Hearing executives outline their strategy and products first-hand was enlightening, but interacting live with some of my favorite analysts was the icing on the cake.

What surprised me the most was how down to earth everyone was. Not to downplay their influence in the market, but I came to the realization that while analysts may make their living off understanding back-end technologies and wireless spectrums, they still share similar interests with you and I. I thoroughly enjoyed conversations around vacation plans and debates over the best local steak houses, but the epiphany really hit me when a flood of analysts rush off to watch Game Two of the World Series at the conclusion of the event.

Most interesting of all was observing the analysts interact with one another, especially those from competing firms and different coverage areas. Here I expected analysts to feel more of a rivalry between firms, but I didn’t sense anything other than the friendliest of competition when over 20 analysts from different firms piled into a banquet room to mingle with each other and product execs. I noticed analysts from the various firms greeting one another as if they were long time friends – and some are. At that point it became clear just how small the analyst community really is.

Over a dozen executive handshakes, a pocketful of analyst business cards, and a couple foot blisters later, I got a glimpse into a day of analyst life and both the work and play that accompanies it.

-Kevin

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