Bandwidth » David Jones (Former Member) http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth Insights from H&K Canada's social media strategy team Fri, 07 Jan 2011 21:05:56 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.2 en hourly 1 Patients lose with lack of clarity around social media and pharma rules http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/11/04/patients-lose-with-lack-of-clarity-around-social-media-and-pharma-rules/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/11/04/patients-lose-with-lack-of-clarity-around-social-media-and-pharma-rules/#comments Thu, 04 Nov 2010 14:25:25 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:9371124 Pharmaceutical companies are getting caught in a regulatory quagmire when it comes to social media in Canada.

Outdated Health Canada regulations that only concern themselves with determining if an activity is considered “advertising” or “informational” leave a lot of blurred ilnes that don’t seem to be coming into focus any time soon.

Blogger and social media consultant Nat Bourre attended the inaugural eMarketing Canada conference in Toronto on November 1-2 and offered up a post that shows where PAAB’s (Pharmaceutical Advertising Advisory Board) thinking is around the incorporation of social media within the regulatory framework as laid out by Health Canada:

Patrick Massad (Chief Review Officer at the PAAB, Pharmaceutical Advertising Advisory Board) presented an algorithm to facilitate the regulatory thought process when planning a social media promotional activity.  Here is the suggested algorithm:

1) Is this advertising?

2) Who is the intended audience?

3) What restrictions should I consider for this audience with respect to disease and product schedules?

4) What mechanism will I use to limit access to that audience?

5) What is the sponsor’s tolerance for uncertainty & risk?

6) How will I align the site with this tolerance level?

7) What are the regulatory consequences of adding and/or linking other tools/content to my site?

There’s a problem with the starting point of this algorithm.  By its very nature social media will always be advertising according to the Health Canada definition. (It’s inexcusable that the current regulations were written in 1996, with an administrative update in 2005.)

Health Canada needs to look hard at social media as a new communications experience for consumers that can’t simply be defined as purely promotional or purely informational. Consumers don’t care about that. They care that they can find the right information at the right time in the right way. If they are informing themselves about their treatment options they want to look at manufacturers’ information, patient groups, news, journals in order to form an opinion.  Look at the stats:

  • 70 per cent of Canadian internet users look for health/medical information (Canadian Internet Project)
  • 70 per cent of global internet users trust branded websites and consumer opinions (Nielsen

It’s time Canadian regulators look at rules for social media so that it can serve the best interests of the consumer.  We’ve always had different rules from the US, so I sure hope they aren’t waiting for the US FDA to take the lead on this…though they are much further ahead in their deliberations.

(Disclosure:  H&K works with pharmaceutical companies on a daily basis.  I’ve had two social media sites pulled down by Health Canada due to lack of clarity on regulations.  These news sites only included compliant news releases and videos that are still available on the web in other places.)

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Evolution of PR tactics for online reputation management http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/17/evolution-of-pr-tactics-for-online-reputation-management/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/17/evolution-of-pr-tactics-for-online-reputation-management/#comments Mon, 17 May 2010 12:00:19 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:7655306 The May 10 issue of Canadian Business had an interesting article about the importance of social media to an organization's reputation in which social media gadfly, Dave Fleet, and I were both asked for our thoughts.  It seems we were in violent agreement with each other.

My quote focused on the idea that many big Canadian companies are involved in social media, but many are in the reputation monitoring phase and not necessarily ready to be part of the clichéd "join the conversation crowd":

To be fair, the way some of the companies in the survey use social media isn’t designed to catch the attention of the public. “I have lots of clients who do stuff behind the scenes,” says Dave Jones, Hill & Knowlton’s vice-president for digital communications. “They’re reacting, but they’re never going to stand up and speak at an event about how great they are at social media.” Some of the companies with which Jones works, particularly industrial clients in the mining and resource sectors, are concerned about social media’s potential effect on their brand’s reputation and are currently more interested in monitoring the conversation than in rolling out their own “big, shiny social-media group.” (He declined to name specific clients.)

I go on to explain that listening and analyzing conversations both good and bad are vital to ensuring that companies don't over- or under-react to what's going on in social media.

Hill & Knowlton Canada deals with a lot of clients who see social media as having a significant influence on their reputation. But it goes much deeper than that. Mainstream media is still extremely powerful as a driver of public opinion, but also as an influencer of search results. With this in mind the H&K social media team has devised a hybrid approach to managing reputation online that incorporates the following as appropriate:

  • Social Media

  • SEO

  • Paid Search

  • Google Ad Words

  • Online display advertising

This slideshow should give you a taste of how we need to be thinking when we're counselling our clients about protecting or repairing their reputations. Thinking about strategic communications with a view to the end audience vs. thinking about the channels we traditionally play in means we give the best and most effective counsel to our clients.

You may have to watch the presentation in full screen as the upload to Slideshare has buggered up the resolution at the default screen size. Just click on the menu button at the bottom of the slide.


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The May 10 issue of Canadian Business had an interesting article about the importance of social media to an organization’s reputation in which social media gadfly, Dave Fleet, and I were both asked for our thoughts.  It seems we were in violent agreement with each other.

My quote focused on the idea that many big Canadian companies are involved in social media, but many are in the reputation monitoring phase and not necessarily ready to be part of the clichéd ”join the conversation crowd”:

To be fair, the way some of the companies in the survey use social media isn’t designed to catch the attention of the public. “I have lots of clients who do stuff behind the scenes,” says Dave Jones, Hill & Knowlton’s vice-president for digital communications. “They’re reacting, but they’re never going to stand up and speak at an event about how great they are at social media.” Some of the companies with which Jones works, particularly industrial clients in the mining and resource sectors, are concerned about social media’s potential effect on their brand’s reputation and are currently more interested in monitoring the conversation than in rolling out their own “big, shiny social-media group.” (He declined to name specific clients.)

I go on to explain that listening and analyzing conversations both good and bad are vital to ensuring that companies don’t over- or under-react to what’s going on in social media.

Hill & Knowlton Canada deals with a lot of clients who see social media as having a significant influence on their reputation. But it goes much deeper than that. Mainstream media is still extremely powerful as a driver of public opinion, but also as an influencer of search results. With this in mind the H&K social media team has devised a hybrid approach to managing reputation online that incorporates the following as appropriate:

  • Social Media
  • SEO
  • Paid Search
  • Google Ad Words
  • Online display advertising

This slideshow should give you a taste of how we need to be thinking when we’re counselling our clients about protecting or repairing their reputations. Thinking about strategic communications with a view to the end audience vs. thinking about the channels we traditionally play in means we give the best and most effective counsel to our clients.

You may have to watch the presentation in full screen as the upload to Slideshare has buggered up the resolution at the default screen size. Just click on the menu button at the bottom of the slide.

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Bloggers telling PR how they really feel http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/14/bloggers-telling-pr-how-they-really-feel/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/14/bloggers-telling-pr-how-they-really-feel/#comments Fri, 14 May 2010 16:00:59 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:7666207 Since I wrote the Bloggers and PR Payola post the other day, a variety of bloggers have left comments and stirred up their own debates within their communities. Thanks to the magic of re-tweets, I've been exposed to some bloggers that I wouldn't have otherwise read.  

A few have really stood out for me and I thought you'd get a cold slap of reality by checking out how some of our pitches land with resounding thuds:

Ottawa blogger Julie Harrison had this hilarious exchange about a review for $1.99 product, including this classic line:  

This is a product that retails for $1.99. Why would anyonespend time reviewing a product for $1.99? I just don’t get it. I wouldn’t even bother reading a review for a product that was $1.99 — I’d just buy it and try it out for myself.

The Bloggess has a couple of doozies in this post:  If I get one more press-release about baby wipes I'm going to stab someone in the face.  This response to a pitch cracked me up:

Weird.  My blog is also award-winning, family-friendly and technologically advanced.  I’m including my paypal address as you are welcome to send me free money from your account.  Thanks for your time. ~ Jenny

How do you make sure this doesn't happen to you?  I can't guarantee that it won't, but our team generally follows these rules when we pitch:

 

  • Ensure the pitch is relevant to the blogger
  • Keep it short, no attachments, bullets and a link or two
  • Give the option to send along additional info
  • Give the option to never be pitched again

 

Good luck!

 


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Since I wrote the Bloggers and PR Payola post the other day, a variety of bloggers have left comments and stirred up their own debates within their communities. Thanks to the magic of re-tweets, I’ve been exposed to some bloggers that I wouldn’t have otherwise read.

A few have really stood out for me and I thought you’d get a cold slap of reality by checking out how some of our pitches land with resounding thuds:

Ottawa blogger Julie Harrison had this hilarious exchange about a review for $1.99 product, including this classic line:

This is a product that retails for $1.99. Why would anyonespend time reviewing a product for $1.99? I just don’t get it. I wouldn’t even bother reading a review for a product that was $1.99 — I’d just buy it and try it out for myself.

The Bloggess has a couple of doozies in this post:  If I get one more press-release about baby wipes I’m going to stab someone in the face. This response to a pitch cracked me up:

Weird.  My blog is also award-winning, family-friendly and technologically advanced.  I’m including my paypal address as you are welcome to send me free money from your account.  Thanks for your time. ~ Jenny

How do you make sure this doesn’t happen to you?  I can’t guarantee that it won’t, but our team generally follows these rules when we pitch:

  • Ensure the pitch is relevant to the blogger
  • Keep it short, no attachments, bullets and a link or two
  • Give the option to send along additional info
  • Give the option to never be pitched again

Good luck!

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5 minutes on designing your social media team http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/13/5-minutes-on-designing-your-social-media-team/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/13/5-minutes-on-designing-your-social-media-team/#comments Thu, 13 May 2010 12:00:41 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:7655105 Here's a fun Pecha Kucha presentation I gave at the Demystifying Digital event hosted by H&K's London office for their clients in the EMEA region back in March.

It's 5-minutes long and covers what I think most organizations wonder about the most when they consider getting into social media: who should do it and how much does it cost?

I always have fun outlining the four personalities I think are key to any social media team:

  • reconnaissance
  • mad scientist
  • communications general
  • community manager

As you'll see, I use my friends Ferg Devins (Molson) and Keith McArthur (Rogers) as examples of two guys who have social media responsibilities at two of Canada's leading companies.  I have to be clear that while I assign dollar values to how much their efforts cost, I actually have no insight into what they really spend. I hope they don't mind being used as broad examples based on pure speculation on my part to support the narrative.  If they do, they know where to find me...

 

D2 Pecha Kucha / Ignite: David Jones on your social media team from Hill & Knowlton on Vimeo.

A special thanks to Candace Kuss for the invitation to speak and the capturing of the narrated slideshow.  She's posted many of the presentations on the HanK blog if you want to see what else went on at Demystifying Digital.

 


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Here’s a fun Pecha Kucha presentation I gave at the Demystifying Digital event hosted by H&K’s London office for their clients in the EMEA region back in March.

It’s 5-minutes long and covers what I think most organizations wonder about the most when they consider getting into social media: who should do it and how much does it cost?

I always have fun outlining the four personalities I think are key to any social media team:

  • reconnaissance
  • mad scientist
  • communications general
  • community manager

As you’ll see, I use my friends Ferg Devins (Molson) and Keith McArthur (Rogers) as examples of two guys who have social media responsibilities at two of Canada’s leading companies.  I have to be clear that while I assign dollar values to how much their efforts cost, I actually have no insight into what they really spend. I hope they don’t mind being used as broad examples based on pure speculation on my part to support the narrative.  If they do, they know where to find me…

D2 Pecha Kucha / Ignite: David Jones on your social media team from Hill & Knowlton on Vimeo.

A special thanks to Candace Kuss for the invitation to speak and the capturing of the narrated slideshow.  She’s posted many of the presentations on the HanK blog if you want to see what else went on at Demystifying Digital.

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Bloggers and PR payola: is this the future? http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/12/bloggers-and-pr-payola-is-this-the-future/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/12/bloggers-and-pr-payola-is-this-the-future/#comments Wed, 12 May 2010 20:12:39 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:7083222

More and more bloggers seem to be trying to figure out a way to get paid for reviews that are being facilitated by PR agencies and departments.  While she’s not specifically advocating getting paid for reviews, here’s a recent post from popular Canadian blogger, Kim Vallee that inspired me to explore the topic of compensating bloggers:

I think that bloggers who write about products, stores and restaurants should take notes. With all the brands pitching us stuff that suit their agenda, it comes a time when we have to say “this is enough”. Otherwise, how we can expect to make a living from blogging. I think beyond the banner ads as a monetizing technique.

Take for example, the sales alerts and store events. I receive many emails every week from retailers about these topic alone. But announcing a sale or another promotional event is a form of advertisement that the retailer should pay for. Why not have a classified section or published a (clearly marked) sponsored post once a week announcing the sales?

And another from Michelle at EverythingMom (Update 05/17: EverythingMom has changed its approach based on a variety of discussions, including those in the comments below):

I read the debates around the blogosphere about paid reviews. Some said paid reviews compromised integrity and others said they did not want to read paid reviews because they did not believe them. Some bloggers have stopped doing reviews all together because it is too much work.

The general consensus, it seems, is that paid reviews are a big no-no. Yet here we are, going completely against the grain. Sure there are sites out there that offer paid reviews. But generally, when moms jump into the conversation, they say with gumption – no. No paid reviews for me.

I took each position in, weighing it’s merits, seeing how EverythingMom might fit in to this arena. We were already playing in it full out with our very own Reviews section. And we stood by the same position — no paid reviews. To this day, Carrie Anne has not been compensated (outside of product) for reviews. But I am out to change that.

Erica Ehm of YummyMummyClub left this comment to Michelle’s post:

I am in total agreement with you. “Mom Reviews” are a huge part of spreading the brand though word of mouth. Brands need to pay writers for their time. These “mom bloggers” are usually highly educated, thoughtful women with earned influence and a way with words. They absolutely should be paid for that expertise. The only caveat is that is should be transparent – ie posted somewhere that writer was compensated.

On my site, like on this one, we work with amazing women. I want them to enjoy some financial benefit for their hard work.

Kudos to you Michelle for putting so much thought into this. I’m right beside you on this!

They are all in agreement that as bloggers get popular and build a following through their hard work and passion, they tend to find themselves in demand by PR folk trying to get them to review products, attend events and share their experiences with their readers. That’s not a shocker to anyone in the business.

The general drift: since a PR firm is getting paid to make the pitch (in many instances), that perhaps some of that money should flow to the blogger for their time and effort.

Pay-for-post has been discussed in PR circles a lot. I’ve seen formal pay-for-post programs run by service providers like Izea and I’ve seen ad-hoc pay for play by PR agencies. It’s not entirely black and white, but at its best it feels a little like buying someone’s influence and at its worst it feels like a shakedown.

I don’t think Kim or Michelle or Erica are wrong in asking these questions and pondering how to get a slice of the marketing pie. It’s a worthwhile discussion to have in the social media community that is creating new standards and best practices on the fly. We have to keep in mind that this isn’t journalism, advertising, or PR. It’s everything mixed into a new media stew and we’re still figuring out what tastes right.

It probably won’t shock you when I tell you what feels right to me differs from Kim, Michelle and Erica. Now, I don’t begrudge anyone wanting to get paid, but my credibility compass swings towards not ever paying bloggers to post something on a client’s behalf. Even with full disclosure, it feels like it would land on readers as a paid post, sullied by the exchange of money and neither credible or trustworthy. It seems like an advertorial and a shortcut to coverage over the longer term of building editorial relationships with online publishers that are mutually beneficial.

You can argue that product demos, products to keep, products to giveaway to readers are the same as cash. You’d be right, but I don’t think it lands on readers the same way. We’ve given hundreds of dollars worth of products to bloggers, but we’ve never given cash. We have worked on a few projects with MomCentral, who reward their community of bloggers with nominal non-cash incentives ie gift cards and gift packs, that are disclosed. I’m still struggling with whether that constitutes pay-per-post or if it’s yet another ingredient in the social media stew.

Over the years several community papers and radio stations pulled the same sort of stuff: “we’ll write/talk about your client if you buy an ad.” That crosses a journalistic line in my books and I suppose I hold bloggers to the same sort of credibility standard as I do journalists: you either have a desire to inform your readers, or you have a desire to inform readers about things you get paid to write about.

These fine women aren’t the first or last bloggers to bring this topic up. But I do wonder if it is the start of a change in mindset on a broader scale. One thing is certain: both PR people and bloggers need to start understanding how each other fits into the social media universe. We really are on the same side.

UPDATE: Eden Spodek, a blogger at Bargainista long before she became a social media consultant at High Road, has written a post from her unique perspective: http://bit.ly/cuiZST

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Canadian social media wiki needs your love http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/01/16/canadian-social-media-wiki-needs-your-love/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/01/16/canadian-social-media-wiki-needs-your-love/#comments Sat, 16 Jan 2010 20:26:13 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:6344492 share the love Pictures, Images and PhotosSince I created the Canadian social media wiki in late 2008 there have been 57 organizations who have shared their social media work and examples with the larger community.

These examples are invaluable.  Sharing our work means that we can learn from each other, share another Canadian example with our clients and colleagues and improve our own offerings by seeing how our friends in the social media community has tackled a similar challenge or used a social media tool in a new and different way.

What worries me is that there are a load more examples that aren't getting up on this space.  My buddies at a variety of agencies are living this stuff day in and day out.  Frankly, I'm not seeing enough examples from you guys (and you know who you are.) I know how busy it is in the agency business, but I also know that there is some great work being done out there that's not being shared.

I'm hoping that it's workload and other priorities like being swamped by all those client demands and new business pitches that's keeping you all from posting your examples.  I sure hope it's not a feeling of inter-agency competitiveness that's keeping some from posting their work out of fear of giving away something good or feeling that there work will be criticized.

We may be competing, but we're all part of the same social media community.

(I'm also pretty sure that lots of people don't know about the wiki, so tell your friends.  Everyone's welcome!)


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share the love Pictures, Images and PhotosSince I created the Canadian social media wiki in late 2008 there have been 57 organizations who have shared their social media work and examples with the larger community.

These examples are invaluable.  Sharing our work means that we can learn from each other, share another Canadian example with our clients and colleagues and improve our own offerings by seeing how our friends in the social media community has tackled a similar challenge or used a social media tool in a new and different way.

What worries me is that there are a load more examples that aren’t getting up on this space.  My buddies at a variety of agencies are living this stuff day in and day out.  Frankly, I’m not seeing enough examples from you guys (and you know who you are.) I know how busy it is in the agency business, but I also know that there is some great work being done out there that’s not being shared.

I’m hoping that it’s workload and other priorities like being swamped by all those client demands and new business pitches that’s keeping you all from posting your examples.  I sure hope it’s not a feeling of inter-agency competitiveness that’s keeping some from posting their work out of fear of giving away something good or feeling that there work will be criticized.

We may be competing, but we’re all part of the same social media community.

(I’m also pretty sure that lots of people don’t know about the wiki, so tell your friends.  Everyone’s welcome!)



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Get your head in the Olympics with Podium Pals http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/12/02/get-your-head-in-the-olympics-with-podium-pals/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/12/02/get-your-head-in-the-olympics-with-podium-pals/#comments Wed, 02 Dec 2009 17:44:23 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5969744 The team at H&K Digital has been working on this little bit of Olympic fun for the Canadian Olympic Committee to get everyone excited about Painting the Town Red for the upcoming Vancouver Olympics.

Pick your sport, pick your photo and through the magic of the Interwebs you're an Olympian!  You can share your Olympic you on Facebook, make versions of your friends and post to their Facebook walls or download to your PC for e-mailing or desktop wallpaper. Try it out and let me know what you think.

Web: http://podiumpals.olympic.ca or http://chumsdepodium.olympic.ca

Facebook:  http://facebook.com/canadianolympicteam


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The team at H&K Digital has been working on this little bit of Olympic fun for the Canadian Olympic Committee to get everyone excited about Painting the Town Red for the upcoming Vancouver Olympics.

Pick your sport, pick your photo and through the magic of the Interwebs you’re an Olympian!  You can share your Olympic you on Facebook, make versions of your friends and post to their Facebook walls or download to your PC for e-mailing or desktop wallpaper. Try it out and let me know what you think.

Web: http://podiumpals.olympic.ca or http://chumsdepodium.olympic.ca

Facebook:  http://facebook.com/canadianolympicteam



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Everything you wanted to know about lobbying in 2 minutes http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/30/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-lobbying-in-2-minutes/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/30/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-lobbying-in-2-minutes/#comments Mon, 30 Nov 2009 20:31:15 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5949765 My colleague, Olivier Baillou, put together this light-hearted video to explain exactly why organizations hire government relations/public affairs/lobbying firms.  If you can't tell from the way the video's produced, Oliver's a bit of a visual communications nut.  Check out his blog for more of his thoughts on how visuals get ideas across.


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My colleague, Olivier Baillou, put together this light-hearted video to explain exactly why organizations hire government relations/public affairs/lobbying firms.  If you can’t tell from the way the video’s produced, Oliver’s a bit of a visual communications nut.  Check out his blog for more of his thoughts on how visuals get ideas across.



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WaterfronToronto case study: 2009 SNCR social media measurement innovation award http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/20/waterfrontoronto-case-study-2009-sncr-social-media-measurement-innovation-award/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/20/waterfrontoronto-case-study-2009-sncr-social-media-measurement-innovation-award/#comments Fri, 20 Nov 2009 12:45:59 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5807248 As I mentioned in my earlier post, H&K Digital's Toronto team was fortunate to have won a couple of awards of merit from the Society of New Communications Research recently. 

The first award I want to highlight is our online influencer analysis work for WaterfronToronto.  I've published our entire SNCR case study submission below for your reading pleasure, but here are a few highlights:

Objectives: 

  1. Benchmark the conversations about WaterfronToronto over a set time period.
  2. Idenfity WaterfronToronto's top online influencers.

Approach:

  1. We used Sysomos Map to identify online conversations in both independent and media blogs
  2. The conversations were reviewed by our analysts to check sentiment and relevance
  3. Relevant and influential bloggers were identified based on the appropriate WaterfronToronto topic i.e. Sustainable Development, Public Transportation, etc.

Results:

  1. Bloggers' potential interest in WaterfronToronto topics and their likelihood of being interested in being contacted by WaterfronToronto was determined.
  2. This information is being used in blogger outreach efforts and in the creation of WaterfronToronto's social media-enabled newsroom

The entire report, which comes in at 60+ pages, is confidential, but here's a list of the type of information we collected through the Sysomos Map tool and our own analysis that provided the meat of our blog-by-blog analysis.

  • Topic relevance
  • Posting frequency
  • Average comment count
  • Sentiment
  • Number of Inlinks
  • Blog influence network: top blogs that link in/out
  • Delicious Links and top tags
  • Top entities mentioned
  • Share of voice for relevant WaterfronToronto topics

I'm not in any hurry to try and boil this stuff down to an algorithm.  Each blog is evaluated on its own merits.  The above items are things we take into consideration as we make our analysis and are open to interpretation and discussion.  After all, we're dealing with people here, not numbers.  We're going for relevance over ranking.

Below is our SNCR submission. All of the 2009 Society for New Communicatons Research Awards case studies are available at SNCR.org.

WaterfronToronto Measurement Case Study - SNCR Merit 2009

 


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As I mentioned in my earlier post, H&K Digital’s Toronto team was fortunate to have won a couple of awards of merit from the Society of New Communications Research recently. 

The first award I want to highlight is our online influencer analysis work for WaterfronToronto.  I’ve published our entire SNCR case study submission below for your reading pleasure, but here are a few highlights:

Objectives: 

  1. Benchmark the conversations about WaterfronToronto over a set time period.
  2. Idenfity WaterfronToronto’s top online influencers.

Approach:

  1. We used Sysomos Map to identify online conversations in both independent and media blogs
  2. The conversations were reviewed by our analysts to check sentiment and relevance
  3. Relevant and influential bloggers were identified based on the appropriate WaterfronToronto topic i.e. Sustainable Development, Public Transportation, etc.

Results:

  1. Bloggers’ potential interest in WaterfronToronto topics and their likelihood of being interested in being contacted by WaterfronToronto was determined.
  2. This information is being used in blogger outreach efforts and in the creation of WaterfronToronto’s social media-enabled newsroom

The entire report, which comes in at 60+ pages, is confidential, but here’s a list of the type of information we collected through the Sysomos Map tool and our own analysis that provided the meat of our blog-by-blog analysis.

  • Topic relevance
  • Posting frequency
  • Average comment count
  • Sentiment
  • Number of Inlinks
  • Blog influence network: top blogs that link in/out
  • Delicious Links and top tags
  • Top entities mentioned
  • Share of voice for relevant WaterfronToronto topics

I’m not in any hurry to try and boil this stuff down to an algorithm.  Each blog is evaluated on its own merits.  The above items are things we take into consideration as we make our analysis and are open to interpretation and discussion.  After all, we’re dealing with people here, not numbers.  We’re going for relevance over ranking.

Below is our SNCR submission. All of the 2009 Society for New Communicatons Research Awards case studies are available at SNCR.org.

WaterfronToronto Measurement Case Study – SNCR Merit 2009

 



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H&K wins a pair of 2009 SNCR social media awards http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/14/hk-wins-a-pair-of-2009-sncr-social-media-awards/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/14/hk-wins-a-pair-of-2009-sncr-social-media-awards/#comments Sun, 15 Nov 2009 03:38:48 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5807243 The social media strategy group at Hill & Knowlton Canada was thrilled to get the news that we had received two awards of merit from the Society for New Communications Research at its recent awards gala at Harvard.

Our influencer analysis work for WaterfronToronto was selected in the measurement innovation category and our successful work with War Child Canada on the Help Child Soldiers Fight campaign in the influencer relations category. 

These will go nicely on the H&K mantle along with the SNCR award of excellence we won last year with Molson Coors Canada on Brew 2.0.  Congrats to our clients and our team.

I'll post our winning submissions separately over the next few days and try to provide a few more insights into what we did.


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The social media strategy group at Hill & Knowlton Canada was thrilled to get the news that we had received two awards of merit from the Society for New Communications Research at its recent awards gala at Harvard.

Our influencer analysis work for WaterfronToronto was selected in the measurement innovation category and our successful work with War Child Canada on the Help Child Soldiers Fight campaign in the influencer relations category. 

These will go nicely on the H&K mantle along with the SNCR award of excellence we won last year with Molson Coors Canada on Brew 2.0.  Congrats to our clients and our team.

I’ll post our winning submissions separately over the next few days and try to provide a few more insights into what we did.



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