Bandwidth » Digital PR http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth Insights from H&K Canada's social media strategy team Fri, 07 Jan 2011 21:05:56 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.2 en hourly 1 Evolution of PR tactics for online reputation management http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/17/evolution-of-pr-tactics-for-online-reputation-management/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2010/05/17/evolution-of-pr-tactics-for-online-reputation-management/#comments Mon, 17 May 2010 12:00:19 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:7655306 The May 10 issue of Canadian Business had an interesting article about the importance of social media to an organization's reputation in which social media gadfly, Dave Fleet, and I were both asked for our thoughts.  It seems we were in violent agreement with each other.

My quote focused on the idea that many big Canadian companies are involved in social media, but many are in the reputation monitoring phase and not necessarily ready to be part of the clichéd "join the conversation crowd":

To be fair, the way some of the companies in the survey use social media isn’t designed to catch the attention of the public. “I have lots of clients who do stuff behind the scenes,” says Dave Jones, Hill & Knowlton’s vice-president for digital communications. “They’re reacting, but they’re never going to stand up and speak at an event about how great they are at social media.” Some of the companies with which Jones works, particularly industrial clients in the mining and resource sectors, are concerned about social media’s potential effect on their brand’s reputation and are currently more interested in monitoring the conversation than in rolling out their own “big, shiny social-media group.” (He declined to name specific clients.)

I go on to explain that listening and analyzing conversations both good and bad are vital to ensuring that companies don't over- or under-react to what's going on in social media.

Hill & Knowlton Canada deals with a lot of clients who see social media as having a significant influence on their reputation. But it goes much deeper than that. Mainstream media is still extremely powerful as a driver of public opinion, but also as an influencer of search results. With this in mind the H&K social media team has devised a hybrid approach to managing reputation online that incorporates the following as appropriate:

  • Social Media

  • SEO

  • Paid Search

  • Google Ad Words

  • Online display advertising

This slideshow should give you a taste of how we need to be thinking when we're counselling our clients about protecting or repairing their reputations. Thinking about strategic communications with a view to the end audience vs. thinking about the channels we traditionally play in means we give the best and most effective counsel to our clients.

You may have to watch the presentation in full screen as the upload to Slideshare has buggered up the resolution at the default screen size. Just click on the menu button at the bottom of the slide.


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The May 10 issue of Canadian Business had an interesting article about the importance of social media to an organization’s reputation in which social media gadfly, Dave Fleet, and I were both asked for our thoughts.  It seems we were in violent agreement with each other.

My quote focused on the idea that many big Canadian companies are involved in social media, but many are in the reputation monitoring phase and not necessarily ready to be part of the clichéd ”join the conversation crowd”:

To be fair, the way some of the companies in the survey use social media isn’t designed to catch the attention of the public. “I have lots of clients who do stuff behind the scenes,” says Dave Jones, Hill & Knowlton’s vice-president for digital communications. “They’re reacting, but they’re never going to stand up and speak at an event about how great they are at social media.” Some of the companies with which Jones works, particularly industrial clients in the mining and resource sectors, are concerned about social media’s potential effect on their brand’s reputation and are currently more interested in monitoring the conversation than in rolling out their own “big, shiny social-media group.” (He declined to name specific clients.)

I go on to explain that listening and analyzing conversations both good and bad are vital to ensuring that companies don’t over- or under-react to what’s going on in social media.

Hill & Knowlton Canada deals with a lot of clients who see social media as having a significant influence on their reputation. But it goes much deeper than that. Mainstream media is still extremely powerful as a driver of public opinion, but also as an influencer of search results. With this in mind the H&K social media team has devised a hybrid approach to managing reputation online that incorporates the following as appropriate:

  • Social Media
  • SEO
  • Paid Search
  • Google Ad Words
  • Online display advertising

This slideshow should give you a taste of how we need to be thinking when we’re counselling our clients about protecting or repairing their reputations. Thinking about strategic communications with a view to the end audience vs. thinking about the channels we traditionally play in means we give the best and most effective counsel to our clients.

You may have to watch the presentation in full screen as the upload to Slideshare has buggered up the resolution at the default screen size. Just click on the menu button at the bottom of the slide.

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WaterfronToronto case study: 2009 SNCR social media measurement innovation award http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/20/waterfrontoronto-case-study-2009-sncr-social-media-measurement-innovation-award/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/20/waterfrontoronto-case-study-2009-sncr-social-media-measurement-innovation-award/#comments Fri, 20 Nov 2009 12:45:59 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5807248 As I mentioned in my earlier post, H&K Digital's Toronto team was fortunate to have won a couple of awards of merit from the Society of New Communications Research recently. 

The first award I want to highlight is our online influencer analysis work for WaterfronToronto.  I've published our entire SNCR case study submission below for your reading pleasure, but here are a few highlights:

Objectives: 

  1. Benchmark the conversations about WaterfronToronto over a set time period.
  2. Idenfity WaterfronToronto's top online influencers.

Approach:

  1. We used Sysomos Map to identify online conversations in both independent and media blogs
  2. The conversations were reviewed by our analysts to check sentiment and relevance
  3. Relevant and influential bloggers were identified based on the appropriate WaterfronToronto topic i.e. Sustainable Development, Public Transportation, etc.

Results:

  1. Bloggers' potential interest in WaterfronToronto topics and their likelihood of being interested in being contacted by WaterfronToronto was determined.
  2. This information is being used in blogger outreach efforts and in the creation of WaterfronToronto's social media-enabled newsroom

The entire report, which comes in at 60+ pages, is confidential, but here's a list of the type of information we collected through the Sysomos Map tool and our own analysis that provided the meat of our blog-by-blog analysis.

  • Topic relevance
  • Posting frequency
  • Average comment count
  • Sentiment
  • Number of Inlinks
  • Blog influence network: top blogs that link in/out
  • Delicious Links and top tags
  • Top entities mentioned
  • Share of voice for relevant WaterfronToronto topics

I'm not in any hurry to try and boil this stuff down to an algorithm.  Each blog is evaluated on its own merits.  The above items are things we take into consideration as we make our analysis and are open to interpretation and discussion.  After all, we're dealing with people here, not numbers.  We're going for relevance over ranking.

Below is our SNCR submission. All of the 2009 Society for New Communicatons Research Awards case studies are available at SNCR.org.

WaterfronToronto Measurement Case Study - SNCR Merit 2009

 


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As I mentioned in my earlier post, H&K Digital’s Toronto team was fortunate to have won a couple of awards of merit from the Society of New Communications Research recently. 

The first award I want to highlight is our online influencer analysis work for WaterfronToronto.  I’ve published our entire SNCR case study submission below for your reading pleasure, but here are a few highlights:

Objectives: 

  1. Benchmark the conversations about WaterfronToronto over a set time period.
  2. Idenfity WaterfronToronto’s top online influencers.

Approach:

  1. We used Sysomos Map to identify online conversations in both independent and media blogs
  2. The conversations were reviewed by our analysts to check sentiment and relevance
  3. Relevant and influential bloggers were identified based on the appropriate WaterfronToronto topic i.e. Sustainable Development, Public Transportation, etc.

Results:

  1. Bloggers’ potential interest in WaterfronToronto topics and their likelihood of being interested in being contacted by WaterfronToronto was determined.
  2. This information is being used in blogger outreach efforts and in the creation of WaterfronToronto’s social media-enabled newsroom

The entire report, which comes in at 60+ pages, is confidential, but here’s a list of the type of information we collected through the Sysomos Map tool and our own analysis that provided the meat of our blog-by-blog analysis.

  • Topic relevance
  • Posting frequency
  • Average comment count
  • Sentiment
  • Number of Inlinks
  • Blog influence network: top blogs that link in/out
  • Delicious Links and top tags
  • Top entities mentioned
  • Share of voice for relevant WaterfronToronto topics

I’m not in any hurry to try and boil this stuff down to an algorithm.  Each blog is evaluated on its own merits.  The above items are things we take into consideration as we make our analysis and are open to interpretation and discussion.  After all, we’re dealing with people here, not numbers.  We’re going for relevance over ranking.

Below is our SNCR submission. All of the 2009 Society for New Communicatons Research Awards case studies are available at SNCR.org.

WaterfronToronto Measurement Case Study – SNCR Merit 2009

 



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H&K wins a pair of 2009 SNCR social media awards http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/14/hk-wins-a-pair-of-2009-sncr-social-media-awards/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/14/hk-wins-a-pair-of-2009-sncr-social-media-awards/#comments Sun, 15 Nov 2009 03:38:48 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5807243 The social media strategy group at Hill & Knowlton Canada was thrilled to get the news that we had received two awards of merit from the Society for New Communications Research at its recent awards gala at Harvard.

Our influencer analysis work for WaterfronToronto was selected in the measurement innovation category and our successful work with War Child Canada on the Help Child Soldiers Fight campaign in the influencer relations category. 

These will go nicely on the H&K mantle along with the SNCR award of excellence we won last year with Molson Coors Canada on Brew 2.0.  Congrats to our clients and our team.

I'll post our winning submissions separately over the next few days and try to provide a few more insights into what we did.


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The social media strategy group at Hill & Knowlton Canada was thrilled to get the news that we had received two awards of merit from the Society for New Communications Research at its recent awards gala at Harvard.

Our influencer analysis work for WaterfronToronto was selected in the measurement innovation category and our successful work with War Child Canada on the Help Child Soldiers Fight campaign in the influencer relations category. 

These will go nicely on the H&K mantle along with the SNCR award of excellence we won last year with Molson Coors Canada on Brew 2.0.  Congrats to our clients and our team.

I’ll post our winning submissions separately over the next few days and try to provide a few more insights into what we did.



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Facebook’s new promotional guidelines mean more time, more $$$ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/12/facebooks-new-promotional-guidelines-mean-more-time-more/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/12/facebooks-new-promotional-guidelines-mean-more-time-more/#comments Thu, 12 Nov 2009 17:10:59 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5777866 Facebook introduced new guidelines this month for "contests" and "sweepstakes" that are worth a read if you're planning on creating or using a Facebook Page promotional purposes.

In brief, Facebook is clamping down on the use of Facebook's existing features i.e. becoming a fan of a page, uploading a photo, writing a wall post, etc. as mechanisms for entering contests.  If you are running a contest with a prize then it must be run as a third-party application on a tab on your page.  Most importantly, Facebook must approve it with at least seven days advance notice.

So, no more using your Facebook presence for something spontaneous to engage the brand community you've built on Facebook for your brand or organization.  Our client, Motorola Canada, routinely gives away concert tickets to its Facebook community by entering a contest on a tab, but that tab isn't an application and it isn't approved by Facebook in advance.  It would seem that's outside of what's acceptible under the new guidelines. (Edit:  because you have to be a Fan of the page to enter.)

Bottom line:  It's going to cost more and you're going to need more lead time to create promotional programs on Facebook.  That may leave small charities and small businesses that have built up a loyal Facebook community looking for a new place to run contests and sweepstakes.

I understand Facebook's position.  They want to maintain control over their platform and ensure that their members are treated fairly and with respect.  But, if you want to do something fun on the spur of the moment, you're left with telling your "fans" to head over to Twitter. 

Some other takes on the news guideilines:

Ogilvy 360 - 5 Things Brands and Agencies Should Know

BuzzMarketing Daily - Facebook's New Promotions Guidelines - How Do They Affect Your Business  


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Facebook introduced new guidelines this month for “contests” and “sweepstakes” that are worth a read if you’re planning on creating or using a Facebook Page promotional purposes.

In brief, Facebook is clamping down on the use of Facebook’s existing features i.e. becoming a fan of a page, uploading a photo, writing a wall post, etc. as mechanisms for entering contests.  If you are running a contest with a prize then it must be run as a third-party application on a tab on your page.  Most importantly, Facebook must approve it with at least seven days advance notice.

So, no more using your Facebook presence for something spontaneous to engage the brand community you’ve built on Facebook for your brand or organization.  Our client, Motorola Canada, routinely gives away concert tickets to its Facebook community by entering a contest on a tab, but that tab isn’t an application and it isn’t approved by Facebook in advance.  It would seem that’s outside of what’s acceptible under the new guidelines. (Edit:  because you have to be a Fan of the page to enter.)

Bottom line:  It’s going to cost more and you’re going to need more lead time to create promotional programs on Facebook.  That may leave small charities and small businesses that have built up a loyal Facebook community looking for a new place to run contests and sweepstakes.

I understand Facebook’s position.  They want to maintain control over their platform and ensure that their members are treated fairly and with respect.  But, if you want to do something fun on the spur of the moment, you’re left with telling your “fans” to head over to Twitter. 

Some other takes on the news guideilines:

Ogilvy 360 – 5 Things Brands and Agencies Should Know

BuzzMarketing Daily – Facebook’s New Promotions Guidelines – How Do They Affect Your Business  



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Defining media isn’t as easy as you think http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/09/defining-media-isnt-as-easy-as-you-think/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/11/09/defining-media-isnt-as-easy-as-you-think/#comments Mon, 09 Nov 2009 12:12:00 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5740467 There's been some online chatter about doing away with the term "social media" and just calling it "media". I can appreciate where this comes from. With hundres of millions collectively communicating online that new car smell has worn off for many of us. The keenest observers of this space are right to point out that this isn't a trend or a new technology--it's the new normal.

From a communications consulting point-of-view, the term "social media" is still required. It's shorthand for all this web-based interaction that's filled with a gooey centre of shareable content and enveloped with a sweet coating of dialogue and served on a platter of hype and hysteria.

At the expense of clarity, the term "media" has become the shorthand for the particular ways the various communications disciplines see their involvement with it. We all call it media, but we really mean the following:

  • Advertising = paid media (space you buy)

  • PR = earned media (space you deserve)

  • Interactive = owned media (space you create)

(Note: 11 a.m.--hat tip to Matt DiPaola from Proximity for turning me on to the term "owned media")

My experience on integrated agency teams usually leads to some sort of clarification of what we all mean by "media" at some point, because of this uninspired shorthand that we use. We confuse each other...imagine what we're doing to our clients.

I like the term "social media". It's different and distinct from the others and demands its own strategy and approach. The best part? it sits right in the middle of paid, earned and owned media.

But if I did have to vote for a name change, I'd go for "collaborative media". That way, our clients would expect their various ad, PR, planning, interactive, search and SEO agencies to work together with each other so the client can work together with their stakeholders.


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There’s been some online chatter about doing away with the term “social media” and just calling it “media”. I can appreciate where this comes from. With hundres of millions collectively communicating online that new car smell has worn off for many of us. The keenest observers of this space are right to point out that this isn’t a trend or a new technology–it’s the new normal.

From a communications consulting point-of-view, the term “social media” is still required. It’s shorthand for all this web-based interaction that’s filled with a gooey centre of shareable content and enveloped with a sweet coating of dialogue and served on a platter of hype and hysteria.

At the expense of clarity, the term “media” has become the shorthand for the particular ways the various communications disciplines see their involvement with it. We all call it media, but we really mean the following:

  • Advertising = paid media (space you buy)
  • PR = earned media (space you deserve)
  • Interactive = owned media (space you create)

(Note: 11 a.m.–hat tip to Matt DiPaola from Proximity for turning me on to the term “owned media”)

My experience on integrated agency teams usually leads to some sort of clarification of what we all mean by “media” at some point, because of this uninspired shorthand that we use. We confuse each other…imagine what we’re doing to our clients.

I like the term “social media”. It’s different and distinct from the others and demands its own strategy and approach. The best part? it sits right in the middle of paid, earned and owned media.

But if I did have to vote for a name change, I’d go for “collaborative media”. That way, our clients would expect their various ad, PR, planning, interactive, search and SEO agencies to work together with each other so the client can work together with their stakeholders.



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Let’s go to the video tape: blogger’s complaint exposed as hyperbole http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/10/24/lets-go-to-the-video-tape-bloggers-complaint-exposed-as-hyperbole/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/10/24/lets-go-to-the-video-tape-bloggers-complaint-exposed-as-hyperbole/#comments Sat, 24 Oct 2009 21:07:30 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5597582 The use of the corporate blog as an issues management tool is perhaps one of the most under-reported benefits for organizations considering entering the social media space.

Recently, the US Transportation Security Administration averted its very own "Motrin Moms" moment that started on the My Bottle's Up blog.  The blogger had a recent run-in with airport security and took to her blog to share her unhappiness with the way she was treated.  She claimed that "TSA agents took my son" in an emotional blog post.  Shocking stuff.  Unfortunatley, she didn't let the facts get in the way of a good story.

Enter "Blogger Bob" on the TSA's blog to set the record straight.  Not only did he look into the incident, he posted the entire video surveliance footage that shows at no time was the woman separated from her son. 

This is textbook stuff:

  • Concern was expressed by the TSA
  • Action was taken by looking into the incident
  • Perspective was provided  by publishing the video tapes on the blog. 

(Extra marks for using the blogger's post title in the headline.  Great for Google results.)

Reputational crisis averted.  A job well done.

 

(Hat tip to my social media partner in crime Lynn Crymble-@uncommon_sense.)

 


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The use of the corporate blog as an issues management tool is perhaps one of the most under-reported benefits for organizations considering entering the social media space.

Recently, the US Transportation Security Administration averted its very own “Motrin Moms” moment that started on the My Bottle’s Up blog.  The blogger had a recent run-in with airport security and took to her blog to share her unhappiness with the way she was treated.  She claimed that “TSA agents took my son” in an emotional blog post.  Shocking stuff.  Unfortunatley, she didn’t let the facts get in the way of a good story.

Enter “Blogger Bob” on the TSA’s blog to set the record straight.  Not only did he look into the incident, he posted the entire video surveliance footage that shows at no time was the woman separated from her son. 

This is textbook stuff:

  • Concern was expressed by the TSA
  • Action was taken by looking into the incident
  • Perspective was provided  by publishing the video tapes on the blog. 

(Extra marks for using the blogger’s post title in the headline.  Great for Google results.)

Reputational crisis averted.  A job well done.

 

(Hat tip to my social media partner in crime Lynn Crymble-@uncommon_sense.)

 



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Google Sidewiki is making me a control freak http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/10/10/google-sidewiki-is-making-me-a-control-freak/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/10/10/google-sidewiki-is-making-me-a-control-freak/#comments Sat, 10 Oct 2009 19:29:45 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5458830 The social media world was abuzz with the launch of Google Sidewiki: a new part of the Google Toolbar that lets people leave a comment on any website for others to see. 

As a social media consultant, I fully understand the concept of the conversation happening about us, our brands, our organizations whether we choose to listen to it or not.  The "or not" part is the important part to me.  It's my call whether I choose to listen, engage, or host a conversation.  If you want to have a conversation about me, go ahead.  Have it on Twitter, Facebook, Friendfeed, you blog, your podcast, World of Warcraft.  That's your call.

If you look at websites as the virtual front door of organization and personal brands, then they decide whether the door is locked, open, whether the receptionist is friendly or whether there's a security guard turfing out undesirables.  Do what you want and live with the ramifications.  Again...their call.

Sidewiki is like a bunch of people walking through that virtual front door and helping themselves to a boardroom to have a noisy chat about all the things they love and hate about the organization.  More power to that organization if they want to let that happen.  Good form ye defenders of transparency.

But let's say you don't want Sidewiki on your site.  Perhaps you're a pharmaceutical company, heavily regulated and obliged to report any complaints of adverse effects of a drug someone may be taking (everything from "I got a headache after taking your medicine" to "I've noticed my brain fluid leaking out my ear since I've been on your drug. Is that normal?")  If the organization hasn't asked for conversation on their site and doesn't want conversation on their site, or they're not ready for conversation on their site, shouldn't it be their right to keep conversation off their site?

Noted Google fan, Jeff Jarvis sees "unGoogley danger" in all of this and I'm right there with him.  Of course, there's a workaround.  Web developers can install a script to keep the Google Sidewiki off their sites.  Will Google honour that request for privacy the way Seth Godin did with his Brands in Public project


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The social media world was abuzz with the launch of Google Sidewiki: a new part of the Google Toolbar that lets people leave a comment on any website for others to see. 

As a social media consultant, I fully understand the concept of the conversation happening about us, our brands, our organizations whether we choose to listen to it or not.  The “or not” part is the important part to me.  It’s my call whether I choose to listen, engage, or host a conversation.  If you want to have a conversation about me, go ahead.  Have it on Twitter, Facebook, Friendfeed, you blog, your podcast, World of Warcraft.  That’s your call.

If you look at websites as the virtual front door of organization and personal brands, then they decide whether the door is locked, open, whether the receptionist is friendly or whether there’s a security guard turfing out undesirables.  Do what you want and live with the ramifications.  Again…their call.

Sidewiki is like a bunch of people walking through that virtual front door and helping themselves to a boardroom to have a noisy chat about all the things they love and hate about the organization.  More power to that organization if they want to let that happen.  Good form ye defenders of transparency.

But let’s say you don’t want Sidewiki on your site.  Perhaps you’re a pharmaceutical company, heavily regulated and obliged to report any complaints of adverse effects of a drug someone may be taking (everything from “I got a headache after taking your medicine” to “I’ve noticed my brain fluid leaking out my ear since I’ve been on your drug. Is that normal?”)  If the organization hasn’t asked for conversation on their site and doesn’t want conversation on their site, or they’re not ready for conversation on their site, shouldn’t it be their right to keep conversation off their site?

Noted Google fan, Jeff Jarvis sees “unGoogley danger” in all of this and I’m right there with him.  Of course, there’s a workaround.  Web developers can install a script to keep the Google Sidewiki off their sites.  Will Google honour that request for privacy the way Seth Godin did with his Brands in Public project



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The intertwining of search and social media http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/10/08/the-intertwining-of-search-and-social-media/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/10/08/the-intertwining-of-search-and-social-media/#comments Thu, 08 Oct 2009 15:24:40 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5436530 The good folks at WPP's GroupM have publshed a whitepaper exploring how search and social media work together.  If you believe, like I do, that real social media success is in the strategic integration of insights, creative, relationships and search, then this is a must read:

The Influenced: Social Media, Search and the Interplay of Consideration and Consumption

Hat tip to @jefflancaster from GroupM's Outrider Canada.

(Disclosure:  WPP is the parent of Hill & Knowlton.)


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The good folks at WPP’s GroupM have publshed a whitepaper exploring how search and social media work together.  If you believe, like I do, that real social media success is in the strategic integration of insights, creative, relationships and search, then this is a must read:

The Influenced: Social Media, Search and the Interplay of Consideration and Consumption

Hat tip to @jefflancaster from GroupM’s Outrider Canada.

(Disclosure:  WPP is the parent of Hill & Knowlton.)



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5 social media trends to watch: Steve Rubel http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/10/03/5-social-media-trends-to-watch-steve-rubel/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/10/03/5-social-media-trends-to-watch-steve-rubel/#comments Sat, 03 Oct 2009 19:16:13 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5348486 I was invited to attend the IAB MIXX Canada event in Toronto and had the pleasure of seeing Edelman Digital's Steve Rubel present a fascinating overview of five trends that he sees having a tremendous impact on how brands will connect to consumers over the next few years:

  1. Media reforestation - media moves from analog to digital
  2. Satisfaction guaranteed - PR and customer care blend
  3. Less is the new more - friends as news filters
  4. Corporate all-stars - passionate employees can connect with customers
  5. The power of pull - create content that can be discovered

Steve's brief slide deck brings the trends to life:

Most social media observers would find it hard to argue with any of these trends.  While I depart from Rubel's on some of the Satisfaction Guaranteed thinking, (I'm not a fan of promoting Twitter as a customer care avenue) I firmly support the idea that organizations will have to evolve the idea of customer service/complaints, HR, IR, PR and Marketing as the world moves from mass media to mass conversation.

A lot of folks have forgotten that Steve was a proto-podcaster way back when.  He co-hosted the original weekly 30-minute Across The Sound Marketing PR podcast with Joe Jaffe. Steve wasn't at Edelman back then and Jaffe had yet to found crayon.  Suffice to say, Inside PR was inspired by ATS, so I took the opportunity to sit down with Steve for a few minutes to record a "4Q" interview for an upcoming Inside PR podcast episode.  Stay tuned for that. It'll be great to here Rubel's voice on a PR podcast again.

 


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I was invited to attend the IAB MIXX Canada event in Toronto and had the pleasure of seeing Edelman Digital’s Steve Rubel present a fascinating overview of five trends that he sees having a tremendous impact on how brands will connect to consumers over the next few years:

  1. Media reforestation – media moves from analog to digital
  2. Satisfaction guaranteed – PR and customer care blend
  3. Less is the new more – friends as news filters
  4. Corporate all-stars – passionate employees can connect with customers
  5. The power of pull – create content that can be discovered

Steve’s brief slide deck brings the trends to life:

Most social media observers would find it hard to argue with any of these trends.  While I depart from Rubel’s on some of the Satisfaction Guaranteed thinking, (I’m not a fan of promoting Twitter as a customer care avenue) I firmly support the idea that organizations will have to evolve the idea of customer service/complaints, HR, IR, PR and Marketing as the world moves from mass media to mass conversation.

A lot of folks have forgotten that Steve was a proto-podcaster way back when.  He co-hosted the original weekly 30-minute Across The Sound Marketing PR podcast with Joe Jaffe. Steve wasn’t at Edelman back then and Jaffe had yet to found crayon.  Suffice to say, Inside PR was inspired by ATS, so I took the opportunity to sit down with Steve for a few minutes to record a “4Q” interview for an upcoming Inside PR podcast episode.  Stay tuned for that. It’ll be great to here Rubel’s voice on a PR podcast again.

 



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Social media job: WWF Canada http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/08/26/social-media-job-wwf-canada/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/bandwidth/2009/08/26/social-media-job-wwf-canada/#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2009 16:51:04 +0000 David Jones (Former Member) 408469:4468444:5011481 , one of the country's most dynamic environmental charities and the brains behind Earth Hour is looking to bring a social media specialist on board. 

I know from first-hand experience that the WWF team is a hard-working and committed bunch that really gets what social media can do for them.  I was fortunate to spend a day with them earlier this year as the leader of a day-long bootcamp for the communciations and marketing staff.  They were great students, really enthusiastic and extremely thoughtful about the good and bad that social media can bring to an organization like theirs.

If you're interested in applying for the position, the job is posted on WWF.ca.

I'm pretty sure this is the first time a Canadian charity has hired a dedicated social media specialist, so this would be the opportunity to break some new ground that others will be sure to follow in the future.  Are you up for it?

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World Wildlife Fund, one of the country’s most dynamic environmental charities and the brains behind Earth Hour is looking to bring a social media specialist on board.

I know from first-hand experience that the WWF team is a hard-working and committed bunch that really gets what social media can do for them.  I was fortunate to spend a day with them earlier this year as the leader of a day-long bootcamp for the communciations and marketing staff.  They were great students, really enthusiastic and extremely thoughtful about the good and bad that social media can bring to an organization like theirs.

If you’re interested in applying for the position, the job is posted on WWF.ca.

I’m pretty sure this is the first time a Canadian charity has hired a dedicated social media specialist, so this would be the opportunity to break some new ground that others will be sure to follow in the future.  Are you up for it?

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