Social Media and News Miscellany

12 June 2009

Lots of juicy factoids and information today that add a little more to my thinking on new communication memes:

  • Twitter_logo_header Of the many striking statistics in a report called ‘Inside Twitter‘ out of Canada’s Sysomos people, this one stands out for evidence of the sheer stupidity of the hordes who now call themselves  ’social media consultants’: “Of people who identify themselves as social media marketers, 65.5% have never posted an update (on Twitter).” I guess they just can’t be bothered . . . or don’t have time?

  • To be filed under the tab ‘Public Relations Through the Rear View Mirror’, according to an article today in the Ottawa Citizen Canada’s National Defence HQ has a new ‘conduit’ approach to public relations (in which all media questions are funneled through public affairs staff, with the journalist never allowed to speak to a subject matter expert directly) that the writer calls the 24 DAY news cycle: “Into this brave new world of hyper-speed news gathering, NDHQ has rolled out what I’ve termed, the 24-day news cycle. Yes, 24 days…..That’s about the length of time I figure that it takes NDHQto answer a question from the news media…..if it is answered at all.”
  • Bear with me on this one. Those who follow me on Twitter will know that as a native ‘Geordie’ I am an ardent — and frustrated, some would say foolish — supporter of the Newcastle United football club, formerly of the English Premier League now relegated to tier two football as a result of an abysmal season this past year. Thankfully, the owner has put the club up for sale (at 0,,10278~3488677,00 about US$200 million). Before he did so, he published a statement in which he said “I’m sorry” about four or five times. Frankly, it sounded hollow given Ashley’s unwillingness to invest in the club and his lack of commitment to its success in spite of having one of the most loyal fan bases of any football club. The lesson here is simple . . . saying ‘Im sorry’ in a crisis is not enough. An apology has to be backed up by action to resolve the underlying problem. In this case, the owner getting out is the right move, although that is not counsel I would give to many CEOs.
  • Finally, this about philanthropic giving . . . “Today, the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy (CECP) shares a first-look at results from its annual philanthropy survey of nearly 140 leading companies, revealing that 53% of companies increased their total philanthropic donations in 2008, and 27% increased their giving by more than 10% year-over-year.” So things are not as bad as the CR critics would have us believe.

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