A Conversation with the Executive Editor of the Economist

posted by Brendan Hodgson

Jet lag be damned… For who would miss an opportunity to pose a few questions to Daniel Franklin, Executive Editor of the Economist?

Not me.

This coming Friday (March 23), H&K Canada has the privilege of hosting Mr. Franklin who will be providing a select group of clients and guests with his views on various global issues and their impacts on key Canadian economic sectors. Mr. Franklin is in Ottawa to  participate in the inaugural Executive Business Roundtable with the Government of Canada, hosted by the Economist Conferences division.

Where do I fit in, you ask? Well, after much arm-twisting and cajoling of those in H&K who are organizing the event, I was fortunate enough to win a few minutes with Mr. Franklin to pick his brain on the changing communications and media landscape, all of which I intend to blog shortly afterwards.

But I thought I’d put out feelers to find out what kind of questions you might like me to ask. I have a few ideas, but figured you might have some suggestions on topics that you’d like covered. So send them through, either via the comments or by email, and I’ll try to get them asked (and I’ll apologize in advance if I don’t)…

141 words about Daniel Franklin

Daniel Franklin has been Executive Editor of The Economist since June 2006, when he also became Editor-in-Chief of Economist.com.

Since 2003 he has been Editor of The Economist’s annual publication, “The World in…”; The World in 2008 will be published in November 2007.

Mr. Franklin joined The Economist in 1983 to write about Soviet and East European affairs. As the newspaper’s Europe Editor from 1986 to 1992 he covered the great European upheavals, from the collapse of communism to the signing of the Maastricht treaty.

After a stint as Britain Editor he moved to the United States as Washington Bureau Chief, covering the first Clinton term. In 1997 he moved back to London as Editorial Director of the Economist Intelligence Unit, where he helped to transform a traditional print publisher into an online business providing continuously updated country analysis and forecasts.

 

4 Comments
20

Mar
2007

Ed Lee

I’d like to find out whether, with all the business knowledge gleaned by all The Economist’s writers, he thinks a guerilla unit such as Project Redstripe is the best way to affect rapid change and a shift in culture within an organisation.

Cheers!

Ed

20

Mar
2007

Brendan Hodgson

Thanks Ed, since you’re the first to respond, I’ll definitely get your question in…

21

Mar
2007

Dan Armstrong

I would second Ed’s question about Red Stripe. And I’d follow up with a question on Daniel’s thoughts about the recent brouhaha on Slashdot, in which members of the online community ridiculed the Economist for its measily offer of a six-month subscription to Economist.com in return for a license to use any breakthrough ideas submitted to Red Stripe.

More important from the conference point of view is to ask about the Economist’s business-friendliness ranking of Canada that has it slipping to third place, behind Denmark and Singapore (but ahead of the United States). How much difference really exists among all of the countries clustered at the top of the business friendliness rankings? Is Canada really significantly more business-friendly than the US – and if so, what is it about Canada that accounts for the difference? And if Canada is such a great place to do business, why are business operations migrating to places like India?

25

Mar
2007

Brendan Hodgson

As I posted earlier, it’s not often that one has the opportunity to pose a few questions to the executive…

Add a comment