Comments on: Are we facing a new type of ‘crisis’? http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/brendanhodgson/2009/05/13/are-we-facing-a-new-type-of-crisis/ At the intersection of yesterday & tomorrow Mon, 20 Jan 2014 15:48:33 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.2 hourly 1 By: Collective Conversation » Media Insights and Crisis Expertise » Blog Archive » Escalating a crisis, 140 characters at a time http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/brendanhodgson/2009/05/13/are-we-facing-a-new-type-of-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-534 Collective Conversation » Media Insights and Crisis Expertise » Blog Archive » Escalating a crisis, 140 characters at a time Mon, 02 Nov 2009 17:04:42 +0000 http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/brendanhodgson/?p=310#comment-534 [...] In his Telegraph.co.uk blog today, Head of Technology (Editorial) for Telegraph Media Group, Shane Richmond, highlights some of the issues that this phenomenon represents - particularly when you or your organisation become the subject of the conversation in the context of Twitter. [...] [...] In his Telegraph.co.uk blog today, Head of Technology (Editorial) for Telegraph Media Group, Shane Richmond, highlights some of the issues that this phenomenon represents – particularly when you or your organisation become the subject of the conversation in the context of Twitter. [...]

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By: Amanda Ciarmela http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/brendanhodgson/2009/05/13/are-we-facing-a-new-type-of-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-526 Amanda Ciarmela Thu, 11 Jun 2009 14:18:03 +0000 http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/brendanhodgson/?p=310#comment-526 I would agree that we are facing a new breed of 'crisis.' As you noted, Brendan, these aren't the crises that cause physical, or property harm; however, they are causing damage to reputation. This type of crisis has the potential to devastate those affected to an almost similar degree. With the use of social media, it is becoming easier for the general public to voice opinions, generate rumors, as well as leak information that they have learned. With the coming new media devices, comes the potential to reach a larger audience on a greater scale. The degree of damage these tools can cause extend beyond the damage of spoken rumor or even direct email, as it has the potential to spread like wildfire. With this new breed of 'crisis,' comes a refreshed communication plan as companies have tapped into the tools that are causing these 'crises' to combat them. With the rise of social media crisis comes the rise of social media defense. In my opinion, I feel that we, in public relations, when faced with this new breed of 'crisis,' should depend on traditional transparency regardless of the channel we choose to address the situation with. With the development of social media channels, the tools in which to communicate public relation key messages has grown. With the challenges that we face with a new breed of 'crisis,' these tools are becoming the most effective, if not the most important, means to address the situations and the publics these 'crisis' affect. I would agree that we are facing a new breed of ‘crisis.’ As you noted, Brendan, these aren’t the crises that cause physical, or property harm; however, they are causing damage to reputation. This type of crisis has the potential to devastate those affected to an almost similar degree.

With the use of social media, it is becoming easier for the general public to voice opinions, generate rumors, as well as leak information that they have learned. With the coming new media devices, comes the potential to reach a larger audience on a greater scale. The degree of damage these tools can cause extend beyond the damage of spoken rumor or even direct email, as it has the potential to spread like wildfire.

With this new breed of ‘crisis,’ comes a refreshed communication plan as companies have tapped into the tools that are causing these ‘crises’ to combat them. With the rise of social media crisis comes the rise of social media defense.

In my opinion, I feel that we, in public relations, when faced with this new breed of ‘crisis,’ should depend on traditional transparency regardless of the channel we choose to address the situation with. With the development of social media channels, the tools in which to communicate public relation key messages has grown. With the challenges that we face with a new breed of ‘crisis,’ these tools are becoming the most effective, if not the most important, means to address the situations and the publics these ‘crisis’ affect.

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By: bill http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/brendanhodgson/2009/05/13/are-we-facing-a-new-type-of-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-525 bill Wed, 13 May 2009 18:55:29 +0000 http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/brendanhodgson/?p=310#comment-525 Agree. The rules are changing how "news" is gathered and how it is reported. In fact, when I look at media monitoring as a means to prevent or moderate a crisis, I wonder if we only have to monitor the social nets and spend less time with the traditional media. Here's why. Social networks like Twitter, Facebook, Flickr and blogs are opening new doors and redefining how we get our information (crisis or not), making real journalists compete with activists for scoops (or cause-campaigns, protests, activism, etc.). Combine those tech advances with a down economy and it will come as no surprise that reporters, especially print writers, are looking to survive downsizing by joining the ranks of bloggers, tweople and other increasingly influential social networks. That's not my "gut" feeling, it's fact. Based on the latest survey from PRWeek, three-out-of-four reporters have a social network profile today, a 50% increase from last year, and 1-out-of-4 are using social networks to to research a story. This is a major development. Increasingly, stories (crisis or not) will burst online first...and that's where the media monitoring will make the biggest difference in managing a client's reputation, issue, product or cause. In my humble opinion, of course. Agree. The rules are changing how “news” is gathered and how it is reported. In fact, when I look at media monitoring as a means to prevent or moderate a crisis, I wonder if we only have to monitor the social nets and spend less time with the traditional media.

Here’s why.

Social networks like Twitter, Facebook, Flickr and blogs are opening new doors and redefining how we get our information (crisis or not), making real journalists compete with activists for scoops (or cause-campaigns, protests, activism, etc.).

Combine those tech advances with a down economy and it will come as no surprise that reporters, especially print writers, are looking to survive downsizing by joining the ranks of bloggers, tweople and other increasingly influential social networks.

That’s not my “gut” feeling, it’s fact. Based on the latest survey from PRWeek, three-out-of-four reporters have a social network profile today, a 50% increase from last year, and 1-out-of-4 are using social networks to to research a story.

This is a major development.

Increasingly, stories (crisis or not) will burst online first…and that’s where the media monitoring will make the biggest difference in managing a client’s reputation, issue, product or cause.

In my humble opinion, of course.

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