Digital Knowledge » digital communications http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson Mon, 09 May 2011 09:44:25 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.2 en hourly 1 Case Study – WLG http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/2011/05/09/wlg-case-study/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/2011/05/09/wlg-case-study/#comments Mon, 09 May 2011 09:34:16 +0000 Mandi Bateson http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/?p=192

WLG | Pop up restaurant and foodie love affair

the client

Positively Wellington Tourism are a not-for-profit Regional Tourism Office in New Zealand and have been working with Hill & Knowlton Sydney to activate their international short break strategy, There’s No Place Like Wellington, in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne.

the situation

H&K Sydney, together with client Positively Wellington Tourism, developed the concept of ‘WLG’ a two week long (14th – 26th September 2010) pop-up restaurant to raise awareness of Wellington amongst Australians by displaying the city as an ideal short break destination and New Zealand’s ‘culinary capital’. Wellington is the culinary heart of NZ but not very well known in Sydney.  We were targeting the young SINKs and DINKs of Sydney’s affluent inner east and inner west. The Surry Hills set that was hanging out on Crown Street and Potts Point. For a small Regional Tourism Office, this was a huge undertaking – so we needed to ensure that the two event was a smash hit on multiple levels.

the idea

The derelict and vacant former Sydney institution ‘The Bayswater Brasserie’ was reborn as pop up restaurant ‘WLG’ (Wellington’s airport code), to showcase the best of Wellington’s dining scene. Four of the city’s top chefs ran the restaurant for 3 – 4 days each, each with their own unique menu which was chosen to represent what they love about the food in Wellington. Much of the produce at WLG was sourced from the Wellington region, including cheeses, oils, coffee, meat, seafood and chocolate.

the solution

From opening night, H&K managed a hosting program  with 38 key media and bloggers. Short lead and online press was front weighted to the beginning of WLG to optimize coverage during the event. With tickets to the event sold out thanks to a media partnership with TimeOut Sydney, the main objective of the social media campaign was to extend the reach of WLG’s key messaging by engaging foodies and motivating them to blog, tweet and photoblog their experience at the event. A Flickr account was set up to publish and geotag photos from the event and Foursquare specials encouraged over 124 check-ins from 3,000 attendees.

The Sydney food blogger is scene is well established and prominent on Twitter which made it the perfect channel for engagement. Once the WLG Twitter account was active, foodies were quick to acknowledge the official presence, interact, retweet and use the campaign specific terminology including hashtags. This gave consistency to the messaging and momentum to the buzz generated over the campaign. The Twitter community mentioned the official account 190 times in just 10 days.

the results

This strategy lead to 24 blog and 22 online news posts and over 60 comments from regular readers on the more prominent blog posts. A large amount of social media chatter was generated via the WLG Twitter and Facebook pages, with over 33,000 people reached via Twitter in just 7 days.

Traditional media response followed the social media buzz, with the pop up restaurant receiving coverage from the Sydney Morning Herald, Daily Telegraph, AAP, The Australian Financial Review, as well as a cooking segment on Channel 10’s morning show ‘The Circle’ with one of the WLG chefs in residence, Rex Morgan.

Two months after WLG there was a 13.6% increase in travel to Wellington, with visitors from Sydney up 30.8% on 2009 numbers. Additionally, Australian traffic to wellingtonNZ.com (WLG’s key call to action website) increased by 52,464 visits  between September 1 and December 31 2010 – an increase of 127%  with 75% being first time visits.

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How to win fans and influence people http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/2010/10/27/how-to-win-fans-and-influence-people/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/2010/10/27/how-to-win-fans-and-influence-people/#comments Wed, 27 Oct 2010 11:23:52 +0000 Mandi Bateson http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/?p=96

Next month H&K will be presenting at Digital Now Australia or DNA://10, a conference in its second year with speakers from other WPP agencies TNS and GroupM and the local team from Google. The conference will be hitting up Sydney and Melbourne with the aim to take some of the hype and hyperbole out of digital and focus on the strategic direction required to achieve real results. With the recent release of TNS’s Digital Life – the most comprehensive study we’ve ever seen on digital lifestyles – it’s a great opportunity to demonstrate how each agency uses insights into consumer behaviours to develop kick-ass strategies across the marketing mix.

As we’ve constructed our presentation to represent integrated communications we’ve realised just how much there is to say on the subject. Unfortunately we don’t have all day. Fortunately I have this blog to explore all of the other avenues that pop up for discussion. Now all I have to do is find the time!

Here’s a teaser for our presentation How to win fans and influence people. We’ve broken it down into 3 key areas:

Know your influencers

Famous Chinese Man who rode his tricycle tousands of kms to the Olympics _0311 PR has always been about finding and leveraging influencers. What we love about social media is that the shifting dynamics of influence has highlighted the importance of this skill.  So why is your loyal PR team reeling off a list of unfamiliar names as your next campaign hit list? Your influencers may not be who you think they are but the journey to find and connect with them will give you a better understanding of your audience and the opportunities at hand.

Plan to give good content

The Story of My Life So you’ve decided a Facebook page and Twitter are a great way to connect with your fans. Have you thought about what you’re going to say? Even the most enigmatic community managers would have trouble maintaining a daily conversation without some great content to share. Plan ahead and then plan to adapt that plan – often. And don’t forget to tuck away some extra budget and resourcing in case you need it when you least expect it!

Conversion is king

Head for Chess 62:365 We’ve heard content is king, we’ve heard conversation is king. It’s time for the heir apparent to take the throne! Big ideas are great but not without reason. When you forget to focus on your objectives things often get complicated fast. Before you kick off that user generated content competition ask yourself why you need your audience to go to that much trouble. Will you benefit from it? Will they? We also make the distinction between outputs and outcomes. What are you measuring and why?

As you can see it’s fodder for endless discussion and the tangents – oh the tangents! – could fill whitepaper after whitepaper. For now we’ll be refining our thoughts into 3 key takeaways to get the audience motivated and inspired. And we’ll play a little buzzword bingo on the side just for kicks.

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Who owns social media? http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/2010/08/03/who-owns-social-media/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/2010/08/03/who-owns-social-media/#comments Tue, 03 Aug 2010 01:33:14 +0000 Mandi Bateson http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/mandibateson/?p=50

This post was originally published at PRINKS.

They say if you’re a hammer, everything looks like a nail. In the marketing world this means when a client comes to us with a problem, we assume our discipline has the solution. If we’re humble sometimes we may admit only part of the solution. So who does it best?

As an example let’s look at the question of the virtual hour. Who owns social media – PR/comms? Advertising? Digital creative? Citizen journalists? No one?

Forget ownership by discipline. Social media, just like every other marketing channel, is owned by strategy.

If you’re in PR, don’t buy the top keywords for a Google Adwords campaign and consider SEO ticked. If you’re in advertising don’t assume a few links broadcasted each day equals community management.

I’d like to hand this explanation over to some of my favourite smart cookies. I asked them all these three questions:

1. Why is your niche a must-have component of a marketing strategy?

2. How does your discipline compliment an integrated marketing solution?

3. Why do you need a strategic approach to your area?

Here’s what they had to say.

SEO

Kristin Rohan, Founder & Director, SassySEO

Search engine optimization store, Shoreditch, London, UK SEO is the foundation of any online presence – whether a site, blog or social media engagements. SEO is about doing research, analysing data to focus content & ensure it is valuable & relevant to the audience. SEO is also about helping people find your site and easily engage with you – to lead them through the sales cycle and then analysing what’s happening– optimising the site, social channels, and content to improve rankings, visibility, awareness & create quality relationships.

SEO compliments an integrated marketing solution because it can be useful in any area of marketing – keyword research is used in content & messaging, competitive analysis is used in defining brand or niche, analysing visitor/site stats is critical to understanding target audience, optimising social media engagements is needed so businesses can find & attract quality prospects.

It’s imperative SEO is a strategy so a business will start thinking about focusing their products, messaging & content from the beginning — a proper SEO strategy will enable this. A new site needs proper focus, organisation & content — and a firm plan to lead prospects and customers through the site to maximise opportunities to engage them in the community, with your business or in a sale. SEO should also be part of Social Media Strategy so the proper measurements/analytics are put in place, relevant & valuable content is shared, and data is analysed to improve participation in their community.

PR

Kim McKay, Director, Klick Communications

Social media in itself is the perfect conduit for text book PR. Universities preach to their students about “two-way symmetrical communication” and that’s exactly how PR works in social media. Relationships, engagement, communication… all these interactive elements that are at the crux of PR are also those which make a social media marketing strategy effective.

PR is the glue that ties it all together. PR is reliant on receivership and response, and in this way it is not only a way to gauge the success of an integrated marketing solution, but also the fuel which motors the next move.

PR (anything in fact) without strategy is a bit like baking a cake for the first time without a recipe; it can be done but it probably won’t be good. PR is a multifaceted practice, and you need the right measure of all the integral elements in order to produce anything decent.

Media

Joel Pearson, Online Account Manager, PHD Media

Media strategy and channel planning play the crucial role of identifying audience and when and where to reach them. The best creative idea on earth is nothing if nobody see’s it.

The way I approach media planning I believe that it is crucial that all people involved in the strategic direction of the campaign ensure they are on the same path before any actually planning occurs. Ensuring everyone is working towards the same business outcomes and that they want to communicate the same thing allows for a much more integrated planning style that ensures the media works with the creative messaging instead of just acting as a housing for it. Too often a media agency pulls together a plan, a creative agency has some concepts and the two are forced to work together even though the advertising may look like shit within a tiny banner.

All elements of marketing require a strategic approach. In particular when assessing and choosing media you need to understand in what way you are planning to influence thinking or behaviour because different mediums are consumed in very different ways and are processed in different areas of the brain. This kind of detail needs to be balanced with both media and production costs as well as business outcomes in order to come up with the optimal mix of media to deliver the clients campaign.

Community Management

Nicola Swankie, Account Director, McCann Sydney

Big Heart of Art - 1000 Visual MashupsHow can you be proactive in controlling the sentiment of your brand that is out there?  To do that we know we need to be a part of the conversation, listening, giving our customers something of value and transparently acting on what we hear.    But how do you credibly join in that conversation and where?

I believe through being a part of your customers’ community or create a community they want to be a part of.   Online or offline. The words Social Media can be scary.  But if your brand goes in with the right kind of approach and role within a community where you do something your customers will value either from an engagement or utility point of view it should result in positive sentiment and results for the business.

I really like Gareth Kay’s thinking   on how today we need ideas that do, not ideas that say.  For me any great marketing solution will always involve an idea that does something and involves people in it.  And where you have a whole bunch of people involved in doing something, to bring it to life you essentially will build a community around it by default.

The purpose of community should always come from the strategic direction and purpose of your business overall.  Whether you choose to join a community or create one yourself it is important to ensure you can link what you are doing back to business results and metrics.   A solid strategic approach should ensure that it does.

Think you deserve the lead on an integrated social media campaign? Your strategy should be managed by someone who understands and respects every element, even if only to brief (and not execute) other components. This will sort your truly strategic marketers from those using a buzzword as an invoice line item.d

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