Archive for December 16th, 2009

Twelve tips of Christmas: #6 Use the slow period to your advantage (part 2)

In the last post we looked at using the winter slow-down as an opportunity to get your team back on track with their regular crisis management training. However, it’s important that your procedures and processes are also kept current, which is the topic for this post.

Every crisis management plan or manual that we write at Hill & Knowlton has an update register inside the front cover. This is to remind users that a plan is only as good as the information it’s based on. If you let it lapse, or the content is obsolete, then you’re not much better off than if you’d never had it to begin with.

If you already have a crisis management manual for your organisation, now’s an ideal time to get up to date with your housekeeping and give it one of your twice-yearly reviews. Here are a few pointers for things to pay extra attention to:

  • Confirm that the right people are still on your crisis management team. People move on and change roles, so it’s important to make sure you have the right people in your team for the next six months. The new year is a natural time of change, so now’s as good a time as any to review this critical detail. (Year-end is also a common time for appraisals, which means the job description of many deputy/alternate crisis team members may have changed and they may also need replacing)
  • Ensure contact details are accurate. It’s been a tough year and many organisations have seen staff numbers decline. Often, this results in some kind of physical re-shuffling of staff. Make sure that in any relocation your crisis team’s contact details either a) haven’t changed, or b) have been appropriately updated.
  • Call your alternative control centres. Usually these are local hotels with good AV and IT facilities. But while we’re looking at the general corporate slow-down, for industries such as leisure and hospitality this is a peak period. Make sure that those facilities you’re relying on to be there if your business is shut down, will in fact be available to you if you need them. It’s not uncommon for hotels to be fully booked at this time of year.
  • Check your hardware. We say it a lot on this blog, because it is the single most common issue we come across in any crisis simulation – the technology that the team needs to operate effectively just isn’t where it’s supposed to be (or worse, hasn’t been identified). Seriously, it’s a boring exercise, but it needs to be done.
  • Get a fresh pair of eyes on your manual. Our Issues & Crisis team frequently reviews clients’ existing plans just to see if there are any new ideas we can contribute, or glaring omissions we can help correct. It doesn’t take long if your manual is regularly updated, and frequently we find that having someone else look over a document provides the opportunity to improve something, even if it’s only incrementally. A suggestion that will save you half an hour in the midst of a crisis is worth the effort now.

The above tips are a useful starting point for reviewing an existing crisis management plan or communication manual. If you don’t already have one of these in place for your organisation, now’s as good a time as any to start.