Sponsors should be there for a good time, not for a long time

As if celebrity sports stars haven’t had enough bad publicity in the last few months, last week’s news regarding John Terry’s extra-marital activities have given the football-mad English media even more fodder for their ongoing moral crusade.

Interestingly though, England team management showed that they’ve learnt some lessons from other recent scandals, acting quickly and decisively to strip Terry of the England captaincy, a decision Hill & Knowlton’s Head of Sports & Partnership Marketing, Andy Sutherden, was asked to comment on for Sky News.

This isn’t going to be a post about whether or not sponsors should stand by their talent in times of duress, but rather a look at how the logistics and terms of a sponsorship can be used to provide sponsors with additional layers of protection.

What I like most about Andy’s piece is his observation that sponsors need to start thinking in a shorter-term mindset. Rather than locking in a 2-3 year deal, looking instead for 6-12 month contracts instead.

Those sponsors locked into long term contracts may find themselves dependent on reactive measures, such as sponsorship bodyguarding, to safeguard their reputation if and when their association comes under fire.

However by having the foresight to negotiate shorter-term, possibly rolling contracts, sponsors can more easily distance themselves from a disgraced fallen idol (if that’s deemed the right thing to do). It’s a great example of thinking laterally about an issue to find a solution that mitigates risk, rather than trying to manage impact, and points back to previous posts we’ve written on the importance of behavioural change as a solution to an issue or crisis.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Digg
  • RSS
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Technorati
1 Comment
02

Mar
2010

H&K London’s Blog » Blog Archive » I don’t care for your ideas, give me a vision and throw me an elbow

[...] There’s plenty of passion about things like bankers’ bonuses, quantitative easing and football players. But expert commentator after expert commentator has agreed for months now that after the initial [...]

Add a comment