Archive for February 18th, 2010

Protecting your brand on Twitter is just one part of good crisis preparation

We talk about Twitter in the context of crisis management quite a lot on here – mostly because it’s a good way of getting people to visit our blog (fact: posts with “Twitter” in the headline average around three times the readership of our next most popular group as of writing this).

However, when it comes to practical applications, much of the world seems to be still coming to grips with what companies can actually use Twitter for, at least according to the moderator of this week’s Frontline Club meeting (yes, yes, we all know it’s fabulous).

What we do know is that like any other online activity, Twitter isn’t immune to hackers. In his post Is your brand protected on Twitter?, fellow Hill & Knowlton blogger, the irrepressible Dan Leach, gives a number of tips to help you get the basics right for your corporate (and personal) Twitter accounts.

The security of your Twitter account should be as important to your company’s Twitterers as the login details for their computers.

Corporate manslaughter guidance results in bigger risks to reputation

posted by Peter Roberts

The Sentencing Guidelines Council has just announced that companies convicted of corporate manslaughter will face fines upwards of £500,000.

The fines will apply to all companies found guilty in the courts from this week, even if the actual incident happened some years ago. You can read more here.
 
The guidelines recommend fines from £100,000 up to hundreds of thousands of pounds be imposed for offences that cause death.

The move clearly means additional scrutiny of corporate health and safety practices and for individual directors, managers and other employees there is the threat of up two years in prison.

If such penalties are to be avoided, the safety culture within the place of work, quite fundamentally, needs to be deemed as critical as any another aspect of the business. This will be a gargantuan communications task for many organisations, who have not only tended to marginalise this part of the operation, but are often composed of a mixed workforce including contractors and joint venture partners, which makes the process harder.
 
Naturally, organisations can help themselves pre-empt such scenarios and a critical first step is to identify the threats – both inside and outside the business – a company faces. This formal risk audit is something we spend a lot of our time doing at Hill & Knowlton. Corporate threats take on different forms pending on the organisation, from waste disposal practices, to haulage policies; pressure groups to flooding.
 
For help in reviewing any threats that your organisation may face, please get in touch with us by clicking here.