Archive for the ‘media training’ Category

Twelve tips of Christmas: #5 Use the slow period to your advantage (part 1)

So far we’ve looked at a number of suggestions to help make your yuletide crisis management as simple and pain-free as possible. However when it comes to best practice crisis management, the smart money is always on prevention being far preferable to the cure – so that’s what we’re looking at here.

For the moment, let’s assume that anything that’s going to go wrong between December 20 and January 10 is probably still going to. It’s no good having a coronary over it, so let’s look at a happier, healthier future. One with lower blood pressure.

Preparation, for crisis managers, takes into account both procedures and people. We’ll look at the latter in this post, as the people you rely on are, ironically, more fallible than your procedures (a procedure’s a procedure – so long as someone follows it, there’s not much more you can ask of it – a bit like blaming a calculator if your numbers don’t add up).

However, January (winter generally) is a brilliant time to nab people for their regular training updates. The weather’s rubbish so it’s no fun to travel, everyone’s a little sluggish after the holidays, and it’s usually easier to get into diaries – both at your end and also with your training providers.

Our head trainer, Catherine Cross, says we’re already seeing several clients planning their winter to include things like media training, refresher courses for spokespeople who may have gone a little rusty after a period of inactivity, and even a number of crisis simulations. Now’s the perfect time to schedule in your team’s training requirements for the start of 2010. If you’d like to talk to one of our team, you can contact Catherine directly here, or call us on 020 7413 3000.

When crisis plans aren’t worth the paper they’re written on

Our recent Public Health Crisis event drew out a number of observations from our guest panellists, one of which was the importance of training for crisis teams and spokespeople.

While crisis management plans are important, they should always be regarded as a tool to help your crisis management team do what you need them to. Fundamentally though, your crisis will be managed by real people, who make real decisions, which have real consequences.

For this reason it’s essential that your crisis management team is well trained. Governments and emergency services run highly sophisticated training drills to keep skills up to date – and so should your organisation. Crisis management teams tend to involve people from quite disparate roles within the business. A crisis should be an unusual event, which means in an ideal world there won’t be many reasons for the crisis management team to work together in their crisis management capacity. Unless you’re regularly experiencing business-wide crises, your teams’ skills will deteriorate over time. You literally must “use it or lose it”.

Here are five things you can do today to immediately make a difference to your crisis management team’s preparation to handle a real crisis:

  • Establish a regular training calendar for the crisis management team. This needs to take into account your organisational culture, team members’ day-to-day responsibilities, and the physical location of team members, but ideally we’d recommend having some kind of formal crisis management training scheduled every six months as a minimum. Include the induction of new team members into this calendar in addition to your scheduled training
  • Conduct a technology audit for your crisis management team. Your plan should include a designated meeting room or control point, equipped with the technology the team will need in order to do its job. However, it’s not uncommon to find that “spare” equipment (i.e. that is usually set aside specifically to be available in the event of a crisis) disappears when you need it most. Pull out your list of required equipment and go see if it’s all where it should be. This can also include checking that all of your team’s phone numbers are still current (it happens…)
  • Develop a scenario library. When we run crisis training and simulations for clients, we tap into a global knowledge bank of scenarios that we can tailor to be fit for purpose. Some of these are developed in creative brainstorms, but almost always the most left-field crisis scenarios are things that actually happened in the real world.
  • Get your crisis agency in for a familiarisation day. When you’re in the middle of a crisis you need to know everyone on your support team is a trusted, capable member of the team. Make sure that you know who your agency will have on hand for you if you need support. A great way of building that sense of teamwork is to have the agency team come into your organisation for a few hours, meet the crisis management team and then take a tour of your operations. This gives them a first-hand experience of the scope of your business, and it also gives your agency team the chance to identify potential fail points (very helpful for developing future training scenarios)
  • Organise a team outing. Crisis management is a serious business, which means you need your team to be comfortable working with each other under intense pressure. During a crisis there’s little time to nurture those relationships, so getting together in a more social sense can help here. There’s something disconcerting about watching a crisis team meeting each other for the first time five minutes before running a crisis simulation

Bonus tip: If your organisation has identified a back-up control room that’s situated in a nearby hotel, then getting the team together at the actual venue means you can also work on your relationship with the hotel’s management, including the all-important AV team and catering staff. 

Note that for the purpose of this post, we’re assuming your organisation has a formal crisis management team, and a crisis management plan – if you’re missing either of these things then get in touch with us so we can help get your organisation’s crisis management function up and running quickly.

Issues & crisis event update: a public health case study debate

Hill & Knowlton's Public Health Crisis looked at the whole supply chain from farm gate to table

Hill & Knowlton

Last night we welcomed more than 80 guests to Hill & Knowlton’s Public Health event, hosted by our Issues & Crisis and Healthcare & Wellbeing teams. Hosted by journalist Lois Rogers, the format of the night focused on a hypothetical crisis scenario involving “killer milk”, which stimulated an insightful and often lively. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special thanks to our guest panellists:

  • Dr David Heymann, Head of Global Centre on Health Security at Chatham House
  • Dr Rob Drysdale, veterinarian
  • Dr Simon Wheeler, Novartis
  • Mr Bart Dalla Mura
  • Mr John Kelly, Partner, Schillings

Following is a brief overview of the scenario, which is entirely fictitious, designed for simulation purposes only, and any similarity to businesses, individuals or actual scenarios is purely coincidental.

 

For the purpose of the discussion we created a scenario that reached from one end of the consumer supply chain (farm) to the other (consumption), and spread across multiple industries (agriculture, dairy, pharmaceutical, retail). The focus of the scenario was a trial of a new vaccine, developed to treat a common and relatively harmless condition in cows that can cause a major drop in milk yield. As the scenario rolled on over six days, hundreds of patients presented at local hospitals and a number of fatalities were recorded.

 

Key points from the discussion included:

  • The importance of relationships with stakeholders in a public health crisis
  • It’s not enough to have a crisis preparedness plan (you have to train for it as well)
  • Why media training is important – for your organisation, your stakeholders and for journalists
  • How to deal with aggressive journalists
  • The role of experts
  • What you can do in the first four minutes of a crisis

We’ll take a closer look at each of these points – please drop back for updates.

More than 80 people attended Hill & Knowlton's Public Health Crisis discussion forum

More than 80 people attended Hill & Knowlton

Had a call from Watchdog?

The BBC’s Watchdog has welcomed back presenter Anne Robinson, prompting this story in PR Week. A question we often get at Hill & Knowlton is: “We got a call from Watchdog. What should we do?” Obviously that depends on what you did in the first place, but here’s a tip from Senior Associate Director, Peter Roberts: “However trying the situation, Watchdog offers businesses the opportunity to demonstrate their sincerity and ability to listen.”

It’s important to remember that the role of consumer advocates, and programmes like Watchdog, is to look at a story or issue from the consumer’s perspective. That’s a deliberate apostrophe because we’re talking about one consumer, up against the world. It’s no surprise then that many stories do come off with an anti-corporation slant.

However, it’s also important to remember that “the media” doesn’t exist for its own amusement. It’s a conduit of information between a subject (in this case the corporation or the consumer’s experience) and an audience (lots of other consumers).

So it makes sense that if consumers didn’t have complaints, there’d be little cause for these shows to exist. Of course we all have things we’re not happy about so following the argument to that conclusion is extreme – the point is this: if you get a call from Watchdog then dealing with the response is one thing. But spare a thought for why they’re calling you in the first place. Maybe there’s something that really does need fixing.

Crisis management and media training in London

Thanks for checking out this first post from Hill & Knowlton London’s Issues & Crisis team. Over the coming days we’ll get the content up and running, and as we familiarise ourselves with the platform we’ll provide a bit more interactivity - so please check back often for the latest updates.

In the meantime, if you’ve already found us then you’re probably looking for people to help you with media training or crisis management, so you’ve come to the right place. Tim Luckett is the Managing Director of our team, and Catherine Cross is our Head Media Trainer.