Posts Tagged ‘business continuity’

Forget your social media strategy, how’s your business continuity plan looking? Five tips to help with next week’s rail strike.

Our UK readers are in for a particularly nasty headache next week, with members of the RMT and TSSA unions set to take strike action. Happily, the BBC saw fit to do away with the vitriole and publish this quick overview of the story.

If you want to read a different version that engages in a bit of union-bashing then Google News very kindly returns another 500 or so stories with varying degrees of that.

Now, I have a confession to make. I quite enjoy a good strike action, because it’s a manufactured scenario that mimics some of the conditions of a significantly nastier disaster. Except without the consequences that usually arise as a result of burning things to the ground, flooding them, or opening up a big hole in the Earth.

The conditions I’m talking about are things like:

  • Cutting your workers off from their place of business (pandemic, natural disaster, terrorist attack)
  • Cutting your business off from its workforce (pandemic, natural disaster, terrorist attack…sensing a theme?)
  • Cutting your business off from its supply chain (and we’re going to look at supply chains in a lot more detail over the coming weeks)
  • Cutting your business off from its customers

These kinds of things are all business-criticial. Social media, as I alluded in the headline, is not. In fact, the greatest irony in this scenario is that your social media gurus can probably do their job just as effectively at home, or on their mobile phone. Unfortunately…they’re not the ones making stuff, packing stuff, loading stuff onto various forms of transport, etc etc. Annoying.

Fortunately, a number of workers will be on holidays next week, taking advantage of the Easter long weekend to get a few extra days out of their leave, so that will help the congestion somewhat. But for the rest of us….ugh.

So, here are a few tips (five, since my headline commits me to it) to help triage your business continuity issues (in the event that you’re not already enacting your business continuity plan:

  • Reschedule meetings (or substitute face-to-face meetings with conference calls). Most companies have conference call facilities tucked away somewhere in the organisational brains trust. Dig your dial-in details out and circulate as necessary.
  • Establish an emergency working-from-home roster. If you need X number of people onsite, in your building, then that’s fine, but if some of your team can work remotely then now’s a really good time to encourage that.
  • Get your files in order. This might involve a special request to IT, as many companies don’t allow commercially sensitive information to leave the building (or to be sent to hotmail accounts!). Make sure you have all the things you need to work remotely (case in point, I’m travelling this week and forgot to take the document I was travelling specifically to work on. Yes, I’m daft, but fortunately a colleague was available to email me a copy, along with some thoughtful words)
  • Now’s the time to work out how to divert your landline to your mobile. Or to access your voicemail remotely. If you’re a team of 10 and only two people make it in to the office next week, then having them answer phones and retrieve messages (or forgotten files) is about the biggest waste of their time imaginable.
  • (Recycled) paper is the new black. The thing with business continuity is…it’s not normally one thing that brings you down. So if you’ve done everything above then that’s great, but what if the strike prevents your IT support people being able to get to work? And then, what if you have a server crash? And then, what if you need something urgently, something that you thought you had immediate access to, but now don’t, and the customer’s on the phone, media are calling and the police just knocked on your door…? Ah. Annoying. So here’s tip number five: print out the really important stuff.

At the end of the day, if you do find yourself stuck at home, connected to the internet and wondering when you’ll be able to get back on a train…there’s always facebook.

Twelve tips of Christmas: #10 Catch up on your reading

Even though many of us are back from the break, the first few days are usually spent trundling along in first gear, so there’s still an opportunity for catching up on all of those things you meant to read last year but just never got around to.

While it’s important for crisis managers (and anyone else in business really) to stay current, that’s not to say that if you didn’t read it first then you’re too late. The “latest thinking” isn’t necessarily the best – sometimes giving your content some breathing space helps you consider it more critically.

Here are some sources that we’d recommend for any crisis managers to take a few minutes reading (and adding to your Favourites list if you’re old fashioned enough to still use one). Some of this will be pretty straightforward but may be useful as a reference for sharing with internal stakeholders:

And if you have any other sites that you regularly refer to for crisis management or communication insights, please feel free to share them here as well.

Floods highlight the importance of business continuity planning

In his second post for Media Insights and Crisis Expertise, Senior Associate Director, Peter Roberts, reflects on the impact of floods currently affecting parts of the UK, and the role business continuity planning can play in minimising the impact of such disasters.

The extreme flooding that has struck England’s North West in recent days has underlined the variable nature of crises. The situation is also a sharp reminder to all businesses, wherever they’re located of the importance of business continuity plans.

Quite simply, business continuity is about anticipating the crises that could affect an organisation and then planning for them. It’s also something we spend a lot of our time doing at Hill & Knowlton.

So, how best to develop a robust plan? Fundamentally, any company is only five steps away from ensuring that they’re in a far better position to withstand a critical situation, with appropriate planning.

  • Step 1: Analyse your business and get an understanding of the processes involved.
  • Step 2: Assess the risks to your business. Threats come in different forms, from power cuts, to staff absenteeism.
  • Step 3: Develop how you’ll combat such risks. Principally, what needs to be done and who will carry out the actions.
  • Step 4: Develop your business continuity plan (BCP). This can be as simple as you want and will contain all relevant contact numbers, resources and procedures.
  • Step 5: Test and update the plan. It’s vital that your plan is tested and that staff are familiar with their roles.

It’s a common misunderstanding that business continuity is only a big organisation issue; this is, quite simply, not the case. The size of any plan will depend on the risks facing a business – it will be as large or small as needed.

Ultimately, experience demonstrates that organisations are more likely to survive a crisis if they have planned for one in advance. – Peter

For help in reviewing or developing your organisation’s business continuity or crisis communication plan, please get in touch with us by clicking here. – Grant