Posts Tagged ‘crisis management’

How social do you want your crisis management to be?

Nearly every article written on the role of social media in crisis management overlooks the hundreds of crises managed by organisations every year that no-one outside of a very small management team ever hears about. However, that’s a topic for another day because we’ve found a very good article by Euan Semple, on the Internal Comms Hub, on the importance of incorporating social media into your crisis management plans.

Euan makes a good point when he says: “When you have an unpredictable situation the distributed nature and inherent spontaneity of social media is just what you need.” That’s absolutely true when you need to get a message out to as broad a population as possible, as quickly as possible.

But good crisis management planning should increase the predictability of most situations facing organisations today, and the likelihood that you need to alert a whole country to a problem is very, very small. There aren’t really that many people in the world who will ever have to deal with a tsunami, earthquake, flood or terrorist attack.

So while it’s important to understand how social media works, and how that can help or hinder you in your crisis management efforts, it’s probably more important at the planning stage to understand how it fits with your organisation’s overall identity, and your existing relationships with your audiences both on- and off-line. At the end of the day, we’re still talking about real people (you and your colleagues) talking to other real people (the rest of the world). Just because it’s on the internet doesn’t change that.

If you’re using a facebook fan page as a one-way channel to push information out to a customer base, a sudden switch to two-way crisis communication is going to create more problems than it solves because that’s not what your audience is coming there for.

Social media is the great communication equaliser in that it levels the information playing-field for both organisations and their stakeholders. This also means that cranks, charlatans, hackers and general trouble-makers get to enjoy the power shift as well. In the midst of a crisis do you have the physical resources available to tackle these head-on? Probably not. Can you rely on any social media platform to self-regulate itself into a rational state of mind? Probably, eventually. In the timeframe you need it to? Probably not.

When crisis plans aren’t worth the paper they’re written on

Our recent Public Health Crisis event drew out a number of observations from our guest panellists, one of which was the importance of training for crisis teams and spokespeople.

While crisis management plans are important, they should always be regarded as a tool to help your crisis management team do what you need them to. Fundamentally though, your crisis will be managed by real people, who make real decisions, which have real consequences.

For this reason it’s essential that your crisis management team is well trained. Governments and emergency services run highly sophisticated training drills to keep skills up to date – and so should your organisation. Crisis management teams tend to involve people from quite disparate roles within the business. A crisis should be an unusual event, which means in an ideal world there won’t be many reasons for the crisis management team to work together in their crisis management capacity. Unless you’re regularly experiencing business-wide crises, your teams’ skills will deteriorate over time. You literally must “use it or lose it”.

Here are five things you can do today to immediately make a difference to your crisis management team’s preparation to handle a real crisis:

  • Establish a regular training calendar for the crisis management team. This needs to take into account your organisational culture, team members’ day-to-day responsibilities, and the physical location of team members, but ideally we’d recommend having some kind of formal crisis management training scheduled every six months as a minimum. Include the induction of new team members into this calendar in addition to your scheduled training
  • Conduct a technology audit for your crisis management team. Your plan should include a designated meeting room or control point, equipped with the technology the team will need in order to do its job. However, it’s not uncommon to find that “spare” equipment (i.e. that is usually set aside specifically to be available in the event of a crisis) disappears when you need it most. Pull out your list of required equipment and go see if it’s all where it should be. This can also include checking that all of your team’s phone numbers are still current (it happens…)
  • Develop a scenario library. When we run crisis training and simulations for clients, we tap into a global knowledge bank of scenarios that we can tailor to be fit for purpose. Some of these are developed in creative brainstorms, but almost always the most left-field crisis scenarios are things that actually happened in the real world.
  • Get your crisis agency in for a familiarisation day. When you’re in the middle of a crisis you need to know everyone on your support team is a trusted, capable member of the team. Make sure that you know who your agency will have on hand for you if you need support. A great way of building that sense of teamwork is to have the agency team come into your organisation for a few hours, meet the crisis management team and then take a tour of your operations. This gives them a first-hand experience of the scope of your business, and it also gives your agency team the chance to identify potential fail points (very helpful for developing future training scenarios)
  • Organise a team outing. Crisis management is a serious business, which means you need your team to be comfortable working with each other under intense pressure. During a crisis there’s little time to nurture those relationships, so getting together in a more social sense can help here. There’s something disconcerting about watching a crisis team meeting each other for the first time five minutes before running a crisis simulation

Bonus tip: If your organisation has identified a back-up control room that’s situated in a nearby hotel, then getting the team together at the actual venue means you can also work on your relationship with the hotel’s management, including the all-important AV team and catering staff. 

Note that for the purpose of this post, we’re assuming your organisation has a formal crisis management team, and a crisis management plan – if you’re missing either of these things then get in touch with us so we can help get your organisation’s crisis management function up and running quickly.

Crisis management and media training in London

Thanks for checking out this first post from Hill & Knowlton London’s Issues & Crisis team. Over the coming days we’ll get the content up and running, and as we familiarise ourselves with the platform we’ll provide a bit more interactivity - so please check back often for the latest updates.

In the meantime, if you’ve already found us then you’re probably looking for people to help you with media training or crisis management, so you’ve come to the right place. Tim Luckett is the Managing Director of our team, and Catherine Cross is our Head Media Trainer.