Why you should market your company culture, not just products

24 August 2009

While a shift from traditional formulas for advertising ROI, I believe that the best youth brands have discovered how to not only market products, but market the companies.

This is important for two reasons – 1) your company is your products/offer, and your products are your company – seems obvious but unfortunately there is often a disconnect here as companies get bigger and execs get removed – CEO’s need to make an effort – cue Richard Branson. 2) there is a very fine line between your offer and your reputation, therefore you need to consider your company from a holistic point of view – no more left-brain and right-brain business structures.

Red Bull – the gold standard for which most youth brands aspire too (and I would argue most brands full stop) – is organised so that at heart of the company sits the brand and marketing. This is a fundamental difference to more traditional corporate structures where the marketing department is there to support the business. Red Bull understands that they are in the business of energy, not energy drinks, and this is why the brands resonates.

I love the idea of promoting the culture of a company as a branding exercise in order to deliver these messages to the consumer. Clever companies are realising their biggest brand fans and advocates are sitting right next to them and experimenting how to leverage this.

Zappos is a great case study of how to democratise social media within an organisation to help communicate the company culture outwards to consumers. We are not talking casual Fridays and a beers on Friday night, but what the company stands for and how this is communicated form the inside out. For example in this latest Zappos video several employees show off their tattoos and tell the stories behind them. Quite personally the tats seem a bit ‘hey look at us, we’re cool’ but I think that is more my personal feeling of tats then the initiative (btw I have tattoos and therefore am able to make such generalisations).

Check out insidezappos YouTube channel here for more company culture videos including baby showers, profiles of employees work spaces, and general antics.

Another company has recently announced a similar initiative. PUMA has a new integrated campaign which features a selection of 14 employees proclaiming their most random thoughts – their love for chicken nuggets and cupcakes, date-seekers and ex-girlfriend rants. Believe the photo shoot featured here will also form the new advertising campaign. I think this is great, PUMA is cleverly using employees to highlight how as a brand they are young and creative.

Check out PUMA’s YouTube channel here for more info.

I would only add an element to make this even more integrated by using this content at retail level. I think it’s a really good feeling if you were to walk into a store and get a sense of the corporate culture. I could see this content on loop in stores, each location creating and incorporating their random thoughts as well. Integrate the ad campaign with an internal comms initiative and watch it grow.

I think we all get at some level that being good is no longer good enough, companies need to be relevant. Youth want to buy into more than a product. Considering this audience participates in 145 CONVERSATIONS a week about brands – twice the amount as adults – I would suggest we all consider how we can resonate at every level, not just product.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • TwitThis
  • Yahoo! Buzz

One Response to “Why you should market your company culture, not just products”

  1. Tarik

    Nice, especially the PUMA initiative, it’s one of the best I’ve seen from the sportswear brand [who are traditionally lagging behind Nike and Adidas in terms of selling itself]. WOM hasn’t been as important it is now for an age, as traditional forms of advertising lose effectiveness as consumers refuse to pay into less engaging brands. It’s way consumer/brand engagement is so important. I recently wrote something about personable brands on Twitter and told people about it – it takes for a brand to interact in a new, previously unheard of, level now to truly be engaging. Resonating at every level must now be a given!

Leave a Reply