Youth Marketing Insights » Creativity http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg Inspiring best in practice youth marketing through sharing of ideas, strategy, trends and conversations about cool stuff Thu, 04 Feb 2010 04:31:40 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.2 en hourly 1 Why I think the Ford Fiesta Movement rocks (and no, I’m not an “Agent”) http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/09/02/why-i-think-the-ford-fiesta-movement-rocks-and-no-im-not-an-agent/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/09/02/why-i-think-the-ford-fiesta-movement-rocks-and-no-im-not-an-agent/#comments Wed, 02 Sep 2009 00:57:34 +0000 Meghan Stuyvenberg http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/?p=168 This is an update on an previous entry on my blog “Ford Fiesta Movement Calling for Agents – but are they agents of change?

In April, Ford tapped 100 top bloggers and gave them a Ford Fiesta for six months as part of a huge blogger engagement program. To enter people had to upload a video that demonstrated why they would be the best ‘Agent’ – ie who had the largest network to tap both online via Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc, as well as offline. The 100 successful “Agents” were provided a loaner Ford Fiesta and have since been given missions to complete – all cleverly featuring the Ford Fiesta – which they capture and share via their social networks. From what I can see the program was designed to stimulate grass roots hype online, and as well as allow Ford to participate in authentic conversations about the new model.

I think this campaign is great – I loved it in April and now I really love it! Here’s why:

  • It exemplifies best practice social media engagement in a clever, and yet authentic way. In a time when brands are cautiously stepping into an important new engagement model – a very personal and direct model which couldn’t be more different than traditional advertising methods – Ford has proven a brand can authentically and successfully stimulate online conversation. While there was a little controversy surrounding ‘cash for comment’ initially, many of the participants and other social media advocates stood by the genuine approach of Ford – in no way does Ford control the content so if someone is unhappy with the car they are free to say so, and it is pretty up front what the arrangement is for any one who runs across this content. Not sure how many people would bag out a free car (no such thing as a bad free car my stepdad said when I was begging for my Mustang Convertible when I turned 16!) but from a marketers perspective who likes to control product messages it would still be risky. Really, it is a simple and yet innovative concept – one I believe may (including myself) will replicate parts of. One vlogger sums it up here, she thinks Ford does it best as they have allowed her to feel she is part of something bigger, not just selling out to get free stuff.

NB read more from Scott Monty, head of social media at Ford in today’s USA Today story here. Follow Scott Monty on Twitter (@ScottMonty) - not quite the Ashton Kutcher level but a Social Media celeb indeed.

  • Ford Fiesta Movement is delivering huge results proving that social media is an indispensable business tool. Recently (July 2009) Ford released initial impressions from the campaign including: more than 2.2 million YouTube views, more than 312,000 Flickr views and more than 2 million Twitter impressions, resulting in more than 13.4 million impressions. This highlights how social media is progressed beyond a niche channel – even given different non-youth audiences – and when done well actually drives mass impressions. Obviously I would like to see some more Social measurements that showcase the impact of the conversation, sentiment, changes in brand perception perhaps – but most don’t necessarily reveal that information (well, unless an agency is trying to win an award). I add that the ‘missions’ are a clever way to integrate key messages. In one instance, “Agent Joe” is tasked with filling up the gas tank of his Fiesta (a fuel efficient car) and driving until he runs out of gas. He makes it 432.5 miles.
  • The Hub and Spoke model in practice, a strategic approach to managing an online brand presence. The Ford Fiesta Movement site – or Live Feed they call it - is a great example of what I call the ‘tentacle’ approach (others call it many things, this is not an original theory) – which is about having a strategic presence in many different social networks and online platforms, and aggregating that content back on your own site. This approach empowers people to spread the word for you, and takes into account that people engage on various social networks in different ways. To truly harness the power of social media (key word being social) we need to understand the ecosystem of how people play online, and at the center is where we should sit. When managed strategically and integrating insight derived from key word research, these conversations can be an important factor in driving web site optimisation – a hugely influential piece of the online marketing pie. This is a great reason why Social Media should not be executed in silos with a couple random people on computers punching out tweets – we as an industry need to move beyond this idea and show how we can integrate Social Media activity to deliver back to the business (see point Number 2 above).

So in summary the campaign is great because it’s innovative, strategic and delivers results – what more can we ask for?

I have one thing to say to Ford, Scott Monty and the others behind it – wish I had thought of that…..

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/09/02/why-i-think-the-ford-fiesta-movement-rocks-and-no-im-not-an-agent/feed/ 6
Levi’s Go Forth: Over the Hype, Let’s Talk Substance http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/07/10/levis-go-forth/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/07/10/levis-go-forth/#comments Fri, 10 Jul 2009 03:47:53 +0000 Meghan Stuyvenberg http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/?p=154 Interesting debate on Ad Age regarding the new Levi’s campaign, “Go Forth”.

I think everyone has had their say on the credit or merit of the creative. I like it, and I am the target, so take that for what it’s worth. Might be a bit lofty even for myself with an advanced Literature degree – Walt Whitman and all – but it’s good. Check it out below. Check out the site here.

I think this brings a truly interesting concept with youth marketing to life – how to mean something and be relevant to your audience. Creative agency reps and media contacts can bag, applaud or turn their heads from the new creative concept, if it resonates with the youth audience does it matter what accolades it receives? I think not.

However let’s discuss ‘relevance’. There is a thin line – if one at all – between brand and reputation and that should be the true test for brand marketing campaigns. So – does Levi’s stand by its positioning? You need to be authentic (yes that buzz word again) to be credibile (two in one sentence). This means more about what they stand for not what they say.

Inherently it seems to fit with me – Levi’s with its heritage also bringing forth the New American spirit. Nice message. But other than creative, how do they stand for the New America? Not arguing, just posing the question. I am very interested to see how they roll out this element for submissions of ‘good ideas’ supporting American pioneers (see here), I love a good empowerment campaign!

So let the war of opinions wage on if this is the next Cannes Lions award…I think let’s move beyond the hype and talk about how Levi’s will deliver on this positioning – because it is a strong message.

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/07/10/levis-go-forth/feed/ 0
Why being teased as a kid might help brand marketers http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/04/07/why-being-teased-might-help-brand-marketers/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/04/07/why-being-teased-might-help-brand-marketers/#comments Tue, 07 Apr 2009 00:13:20 +0000 Meghan Stuyvenberg http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/?p=100 There are all different types of bullying, some more spiteful and hurtful than others. However some forms of teasing, while at the time of childhood development could be quite damaging, are actually probably more a compliment. This is called impersonation, we all know how the saying goes, it is the biggest form of flattery.

With that in mind, watch this Dove Evolution parody:

While I know the video or remake is not new, I just got this for the first time. It highlights how the central idea offered by Dove in the form of a spreadable video is so powerful and simple, and now so iconic, that others borrow from it to spread their own ideas which live on in the online universe. This video is only one example of the several that have sprouted up in the years since this Dove brand campaign launched in 2006, and it is case in point that the best ideas are those that can be stripped back, appropriated and reworked by a variety of communities. Look beyond the content of the re-make as it does not have to be about the product anymore, if you inspire people to act or to speak you are evolving as a brand. Probably someone is going to come across this clip for the first time (not seeing the Dove Evolution ad), and create a mock of a mock. The cycle of culture creation continues, and deep within the new content lies the heart and soul of the first version….the potential is inspiring actually.

As brand managers we should take the time to grasp this opportunity, and instead of trying to stop or contain the online shenanigans, embrace it. Allow people to have fun and create their own interpretations. It is brave to allow consumers to be brand transmitters as that means we lose control, but it is naïve to think that they aren’t already. This is a modern approach to brand-to-consumer communications that really grasps how it works in real life. I would love to see Dove somehow harnessing and connecting back to the consumer activity, not to control it but to remain in the “conversation” so to speak, build on the momentum.

I’m not inherently a creative person with a big “c” so instead of creating my own video I am going to re-post Dove’s original ad and hope that this discussion inspires someone else who might stumble upon this blog.

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/04/07/why-being-teased-might-help-brand-marketers/feed/ 0
The Pixel Generation’s music video: Chairlift’s “Evident Utensil” http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/03/02/the-pixel-generations-music-video-chairlifts-evident-utensil/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/03/02/the-pixel-generations-music-video-chairlifts-evident-utensil/#comments Mon, 02 Mar 2009 03:44:45 +0000 Meghan Stuyvenberg http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/?p=52 For a dreary Monday thought this “pixel nation” video would provide a little inspiration.

Chairlift’s music video “Evident Utensil” uses an editing effect known as “datamoshing” to create this throw-back, psychedelic feel. According to Wikipedia this is “visual style is produced by an exploit of the different ways video codecs process motion and color information”….whatever that means….

Why I like it – I like anything that challenges conventional interpretation. From a youth marketing perspective, I think it highlights the visual cues that appeal to the Pixel Generation. It also has a not-so-subtle sense of visual irony that is relevant to kids who are growing up on computers – the band is frolicking in nature fields, but the video is this uber-synthetic visual mashup.

Whatever the meaning behind the message, it is creative and unique. So sit back and enjoy (and don’t adjust your screen)…hopefully it provides you with some inspiration as well.

Credits:

Chairlift, “Evident Utensil”
Video directed by Ray Tintori
Cinematography by Rob Leitzell
Datamoshery by Bob Weisz

Oh, and watch the How To here:

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/03/02/the-pixel-generations-music-video-chairlifts-evident-utensil/feed/ 0
Ford Fiesta movement calling for “agents”, but are they agents of change? http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/02/24/ford-fiesta-movement/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/02/24/ford-fiesta-movement/#comments Tue, 24 Feb 2009 00:11:59 +0000 Meghan Stuyvenberg http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/?p=41

Love the new Ford Fiesta campaign (www.fiestamovement.com) – the company is giving away 100 free cars to chosen “agents” as part of an ambassador program. To enter people (I’m assuming as they are targeting “millennials” there are restrictions on who can enter but didn’t come across them as of yet) have to submit a short video on their own YouTube channel (great idea as they will have more reach, one of the entrants has a video with 1.2 million views…). As part of the vid they need to share how big their social network is and what it consists of, might as well be upfront in what Ford is asking of them, right? Once they have the car Ford asks that they blog, tweet and share their experiences with friends…

So let me get this straight – I can submit a video, get a FREE car (already hooked), and write about it on Facebook – sold!

I like it for several reasons – it empowers people to leverage their network versus trying to pull everyone onto the Ford site, it is transparent in its intent – hey blog for us and you may get a free car, and the message is simple hence why there are already 1,500+ entries. It might not solve the world’s problems and give Ford a CSR platform, but I think it is clever and fun, all you have to do is check out a few of the videos to get what I mean.

Not just a pretty face, it is also a strategic business move -  according to Sam De La Garza, Ford’s small car marketing manager (in a recent comment on MarketingDaily), “By the time of the Fiesta’s U.S. launch, Millennials will account for 28% of the country’s driving population (a total of 70 million new drivers). The movement gives [Ford] an opportunity to connect with the group before they have established brand loyalty while appealing to their affinity for social networking and technology.”

So the strategy seems solid, the launch has proven to be successful, now I look forward to following the follow-up. How will this campaign in which they are encouraging direct consumer feedback on their product change either marketing or development? I want to see what Ford does with any constructive feedback (ie is this being used for R&D purposes), and how they will use the platform to turn any potential criticisms into positives. Early days but if they can harness these conversational elements inherent in social media marketing, they could nail it.

And just for fun, wanted to share my fav video of those I watched – Ford, Fiesta (can you believe I actually took the time to watch several, but they were amusing, what can I say?)  – definitely give both of these guys one! And I want an invite to the Ford, Fiesta :)

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/meghanstuyvenberg/2009/02/24/ford-fiesta-movement/feed/ 7