Marketing Technology » policies http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook Combining marketing and technology to develop new markets and grow existing ones Tue, 11 Jan 2011 16:47:54 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.2 en hourly 1 Announcing Hill & Knowlton’s New Social Media Principles http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2009/09/23/hill-and-knowlton-social-media-principles/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2009/09/23/hill-and-knowlton-social-media-principles/#comments Wed, 23 Sep 2009 17:53:32 +0000 admin http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/?p=545 Almost a month ago, I asked for help to update Hill & Knowlton’s social media principles.

This afternoon, our CEO sent out the final version to all staff worldwide. We’ve already updated our public principles on our website, but I also wanted to share the full document here and explain a little about the process we’ve been through, what we’ve changed and why.

Summary

Our principles are split into three sections: personal use of social media; professional use of social media on behalf of our company and clients; and use of our official social media platforms. You might say this separation isn’t necessary, but we have found that not all of our staff operate in all these spaces so we want to make sure they can quickly identify the bits that are relevant to them.

You might also say that this makes them too long, and the only guideline should actually be “use your common sense”. That is undoubtedly a valid approach but if we are talking about being accountable to ourselves, our clients and the social media community, that simply doesn’t wash.

Our principles are centered around encouraging staff to participate appropriately not restricting their ability to do so. As communications professionals, it is essential that we are able to explore, understand and participate in social media in order to credibly advise our clients how to do the same.

A few other things worthy of note:

  • We have a 24/7 email hotline – as well as our extensive digital practice – where staff can ask questions about what is/isn’t appropriate. Again this is designed to help, not hinder.
  • We have defined a complaints procedure designed to be fair to everyone. Too often, we see knee-jerk reactions that don’t look at the issue objectively.
  • Unlike version one, this time we have asked all staff to click a link in order to confirm that they have read and understand the principles.

The Process

For those of you trying to conduct a similar exercise in your own organization (or with clients), you might be interested in how we did it. If not, skip to the next section. Bear in mind that this was an update to existing guidelines not creation from scratch.

  1. We put the existing guidelines on our internal wiki platform and invited everyone to edit or comment on the different sections.
  2. Someone took all the feedback and created an updated version of the guidelines
  3. This was circulated as a draft to that community, socialized with senior management for comment and shared externally on this blog
  4. Final feedback was incorporated (mainly clarifications) before being signed off by the CEO, COO, CMO and digital practice head.

The Principles

Links to the text of each section of the principles can be found below.

Please feel free to use, copy or adapt these principles as part of your own social media policies. It would be nice if you could let us know if they’ve been helpful too.

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2009/09/23/hill-and-knowlton-social-media-principles/feed/ 2
Help us write our social media guidelines http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2009/08/24/help-us-write-our-social-media-guidelines/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2009/08/24/help-us-write-our-social-media-guidelines/#comments Mon, 24 Aug 2009 11:02:51 +0000 admin http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/?p=513 In May 2005, Hill & Knowlton wrote and then published our first personal blogging guidelines. Two years ago, as we started to give our clients more and more social media marketing advice, we updated these to create a wider set of social media principles.

Now it’s time to update these again. We’ve consulted widely internally, and would now like to hear what the people we might encounter online whilst representing our clients think.

So we’ve published the current version of our internal draft. You can review it below or on Scribd.

Please leave a comment here or on Scribd and let us know what you think, what works and what doesn’t, and what your experiences of PR and marketing agencies participating in social media have been.

We’ll review all the comments and the end of the week and update as necessary, before adopting internally and publishing the final version here.

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2009/08/24/help-us-write-our-social-media-guidelines/feed/ 7
Five steps to a successful corporate Twitter presence http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2008/12/08/five-steps-to-a-successful-corporate-twitter-presence/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2008/12/08/five-steps-to-a-successful-corporate-twitter-presence/#comments Mon, 08 Dec 2008 13:16:00 +0000 admin http://blogs2.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/11492.aspx As Twitter gathers pace, we are seeing more use of the micro-blogging community by companies and brands. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that, but like blogging that went before they will come unstuck if they don’t take the time to understand the platform before just wading in.

First let me state my opinion about companies and brands using Twitter – or any social media for that matter. The “screen name” you use says a lot. On Twitter I see an increasing number of accounts that are identifiable only as a company or brand name, rather than an individual. Personally, I’m not a fan of this. My logic goes something like this:

  • For me, social media is about human interaction.
  • People are human. Brands and companies are not.
  • The people who work for those brands and companies are.
  • I would prefer to interact with real people using their real names than anonymous company or brand names.
  • I would rather someone use their real name and include their brand/company in a profile than the other way round.

I accept that this is a personal point of view. Yours may differ. But companies need to tread carefully.

With this in mind, and appreciating that some companies will want to use brand, company and department names for their Twitter account – my definition of a corporate Twitter account, here is a suggested five steps etiquette guide for them:

  1. Listen. It’s easy to set up and subscribe to a search of your brand or company name.
  2. Add value. Provide useful content for those that choose to follow you.
  3. Only follow when followed or mentioned. Having an anonymous entity follow you is a bit like receiving spam – you don’t know who it is or why you’re getting it. If your following:followers ratio is more than 2:1 then you are probably being a bit desperate.
  4. Reply. Respond to every tweet directed at you.
  5. Use replies rather than direct messages. Be transparent about what you’re saying to others on Twitter.
]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2008/12/08/five-steps-to-a-successful-corporate-twitter-presence/feed/ 14
To block or not to block… http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2008/12/03/to-block-or-not-to-block/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2008/12/03/to-block-or-not-to-block/#comments Wed, 03 Dec 2008 20:52:00 +0000 admin http://blogs2.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/11475.aspx Since writing my book, the most common question I have been asked during presentations of my research is “should companies block access to Facebook?”. The answer, in my opinion, is not a straightforward yes or no, but usually “it depends”.

However new research from the Chartered Institute of Management suggests otherwise, going as far as to say that “the failure to allow widespread use of technology will hinder UK business in the long-run.”

There is, the organisation argues, a disconnect between employers who view Internet activity as a “massive time-waster” and the enthusiasm for Internet-based applications amongst Generation Y managers aged 35 and under.

The survey of 862 Institute members (which is apparently “almost 1,000″ according to the press release) found that 65 per cent of their employers block “inappropriate” websites and 18 per cent impose curfews that dictate when the Internet can be used at work. The study also claims that 65 per cent monitor employee Internet access, although I suspect that is considerably understated.

Whilst some of the other findings are somewhat dubious (relying yet again on respondents’ recollection of what they have done online in the last three months) and trying – and failing – to jump the Enterprise 2.0 bandwagon (“web-casting” is apparently a “new Internet (Web 2.0) technology”), this is further fuel to the argument that senior executives need to start boning up on what their future managers are going to expect – and demand – from them.

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2008/12/03/to-block-or-not-to-block/feed/ 0
Half of Barracuda Customers block MySpace or Facebook http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2007/11/07/half-of-barracuda-customers-block-myspace-or-facebook/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2007/11/07/half-of-barracuda-customers-block-myspace-or-facebook/#comments Wed, 07 Nov 2007 14:54:56 +0000 admin http://blogs2.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/9802.aspx A study of its customers by web security company Barracuda Networks has found that 50% of them block employee access to MySpace, Facebook or both.

MySpace comes off the worst, being blocked by 44% of customers compared to Face-’blocking’ at only 26%.

So with all the noise about Facebook’s new social advertising platform (the best take by far is Nick Carr’s), it seems that at least some of the intended victims are safe in the knowledge that they’ll never get exposed to them anyway.

]]>
http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/niallcook/2007/11/07/half-of-barracuda-customers-block-myspace-or-facebook/feed/ 0