ResponsAbility » Responsibility http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability Thoughts on corporate responsibility and sustainability Tue, 24 Jul 2012 15:12:42 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.2 en hourly 1 America “lost” the iPhone work – but maybe that’s not the worst part http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2012/01/26/america-%e2%80%9clost%e2%80%9d-the-iphone-work-%e2%80%93-but-maybe-that%e2%80%99s-not-the-worst-part/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2012/01/26/america-%e2%80%9clost%e2%80%9d-the-iphone-work-%e2%80%93-but-maybe-that%e2%80%99s-not-the-worst-part/#comments Thu, 26 Jan 2012 19:41:15 +0000 Tara Knight http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/?p=320 I was forwarded a recent New York Times article about Apple’s manufacturing in China that really got me thinking about the scope of Corporate Social Responsibility and the entire ecosystem that exists around multinational companies. The intended – and unintended consequences of the choice of actions by corporate management, and ultimately, what it says about our societies as a whole.

What really got me thinking in the article though was a story of the creation of the glass screen for the iPhone.  Steve Jobs wasn’t happy with the prototype’s plastic screen, and demanded a glass alternative that wouldn’t scratch. Famously uncompromising, his insistence demanded the flexibility and instant change of manufacturing capacity and capability that could only be accommodated in another jurisdiction (China) primarily because of working expectations (both written and unwritten) that are no longer legal, expected or accepted in many other countries.

The article quotes a current Apple executive, saying “we shouldn’t be criticized for using Chinese workers. The U.S. has stopped producing people with the skills we need.” In this case, however, what Apple needed, was workers who could be roused from their dormitory beds in the middle of the night for a 12 hour shift (Apple does monitor and publish an audit report of their suppliers). Obviously, Apple is only one of many companies choosing more “flexible” and “capable” locations for their manufacturing needs.

What does it say about our society that expediency and efficiency – valuable and real requirements of business today – have a trump card over how we treat and cooperate with other societies? I know many brilliant people have tackled this question, with few palatable answers – and the cynical among us might learn towards the idea of corporate activity as inherently pathological.

I am caught – ultimately, our corporations, our institutions, our interactions are defined by someone –and how these “someones” charged with the responsibility of directing organizations choose to  interact and collaborate with the world are an example set for the people around them.  I fall more with John Locke if only that I cannot bear the idea of Thomas Hobbes’ society that puts so little faith in its members. The question remains, in our global economy, is it possible to be a healthy, ethical corporation? How do we realize a global social contract – or are we simply unable to think beyond our immediate world and consider the reality of others?

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Not Just a “Pick-Up” Line http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2011/11/18/following-the-lead-of-the-pick-up-artists/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2011/11/18/following-the-lead-of-the-pick-up-artists/#comments Fri, 18 Nov 2011 17:08:59 +0000 Andrew Cuneo http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/?p=316 I think many of us who listen to the evening news broadcasts expect to hear a lot of the same thing: Fighting here, budget cuts there, unemployment is “XX” high. But every so often, you come across a story that makes you feel good about where the human race is going. And this happened to me Wednesday evening. As my daughter and I sat on the couch watching NBC Nightly News, a story at the end of the telecast came on that both made us stop and listen.

A young group of individuals called “Pick up America” is driving across the country picking up roadside trash. Traveling in an old school bus running on recycled vegetable oil, the youth group started in March 2010 in Maryland and have since traveled 2/3rds of the way across our nation picking up close to 140,000 lbs of litter left by careless motorists. They get local volunteers involved, bring a sense of accomplishment to those who participate and leave lessons for future generations to live by. Why do it? Member Jeff Chen says: “We’re young people and need to take a hold of our future.”

It’s time we all shared the enthusiasm these “pick up artists” are exhibiting. Though too young to understand, my daughter watched. It’s a lesson I hope she (and for that matter we) learn – from activities in everyday life to what you do in the office.

What do you do to help the environment?

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How Corporate America Can Benefit from a More Sustainable Healthcare System http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2011/05/27/how-corporate-america-can-benefit-from-a-more-sustainable-healthcare-system/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2011/05/27/how-corporate-america-can-benefit-from-a-more-sustainable-healthcare-system/#comments Thu, 26 May 2011 20:15:51 +0000 Tara Knight http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/?p=284 I am posting on behalf of Robert Ludke, Managing Director Public Strategies, Inc. who is contributed this posting to ResponsAbility

When people refer to “sustainability,” it is often in the context of a company seeking to improve its bottom line and the environment by doing things like using less water and becoming more energy efficient. Yet, the most unsustainable cost facing nearly every company across the world is healthcare.

The challenge of increasing healthcare costs is particularly problematic in the United States – one of the few countries in the world where employer-funded coverage is the mainstay of the insurance system and universal coverage is not guaranteed. Case in point: for American companies, healthcare coverage is the most expensive benefit paid by employers.

Despite all the flaws in the current system – including the high cost of healthcare, the inefficient delivery of care and the fact that more than 50 million Americans lack coverage – there is little likelihood of fundamental change.

This means nearly every one of our U.S.-based clients is facing a challenge. They are largely stuck in the general confines of the current system, with its many shortcomings, not the least of which is an unsustainable cost trajectory.

Some companies are seeking to address that challenge by encouraging their employees to live healthier and more responsible lives in which a greater emphasis is placed on preventive care. While some incremental success has been achieved in encouraging people to lead healthier lives and increasing access to preventive healthcare, such efforts will not produce savings sufficient enough to bend the so-called “cost curve” to the point where there is a reduction in the amount of money spent on healthcare.

In order to bend the cost curve, a fundamental shift in how society manages healthcare is needed. While that challenge is daunting, for a significant number of our clients, it presents an opportunity not only to benefit their bottom line but also to improve their reputation as responsible employers committed to a healthier, more sustainable society.

In particular, many of our largest clients have the ability to use the purchasing power they gain from the number of employees they cover with health insurance to either insist on changes to how care is delivered to their employees or to serve as a useful resource to policymakers and thought leaders who are working to improve health outcomes at a lower cost.

If the private sector wants to have a more effective voice in how the cost of healthcare can be reduced while improving the outcomes of that care, it needs to engage in and shape the public debate. Opportunities abound for points of interaction with the health policy community, to launch pilot projects to develop and implement best practices, and for leading companies to be held out to the public as thought leaders in developing and implementing policies to improve the lives of their employees and the broader public.

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Do plantations cause violence and death? http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2010/09/07/do-plantations-cause-violence-and-death/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2010/09/07/do-plantations-cause-violence-and-death/#comments Tue, 07 Sep 2010 18:39:15 +0000 Tara Knight http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/?p=153 It’s a powerful question. Certainly, the last type of question I expected to see leading me into a corporate global sustainability microsite. Amazingly, it wasn’t my first surprise during my visit to the Stora Enso Global Responsibility site.

Stora Enso’s CSR microsite is ambitious. An integrated paper, packaging and wood products company based in Helsinki, Finland, Stora Enso is one of the world’s largest pulp and paper manufacturers, with operations in Europe, Latin America and Asia. Stora Enso and Hill & Knowlton’s Helsinki office built this global sustainability site to communicate Stora Enso’s commitment to sustainability. I was introduced to the site by a colleague, Jari Lähdevuori, who is part of the H&K project team that developed the microsite.

If you haven’t had a chance to take a tour, allow me to offer you a brief overview of the site. In addition to questions like “Do plantations cause violence and death?,” the site also asks visitors “How much does the forest industry accelerate climate change?” and “Does recycling paper really do any good?” Each of these questions are answered by different employees of the Stora Enso company and its stakeholder groups (including customers, forest owners and activists).

I was seriously impressed when I toured the site and found a one-on-one interview between Sini Harkki,  Greenpeace’s Nordic forest campaigner and Stora Enso CEO Jouko Karvinen where they speak quite frankly about the challenges and efforts of Stora Enso’s forestry policies. The site also includes experiential elements such as “How to build a plantation” , a module on “Lessons Learned”, and a “Test Yourself” knowledge section narrated by Carrot Mob Finland.

I asked my colleague on the project team, Jari Lähdevuori, to tell me a bit more about how this project came about:

Tara: What was the reason for the site?

Jari says: Stora Enso felt the communications about their commitment to sustainability were lost in the wash of messages from mainstream media and Non-Governmental Organizations, which seemed to have much greater reach and impact. Stora Enso did not feel their own sustainability messages were reaching the general public on a global scale.

Stora Enso wanted to communicate their sustainability policies and practices directly to the public, and bring more attention to these topics. To do that effectively, our team felt we needed compelling and entertaining content – hence, the global responsibility site.”

Tara: It’s no surprise that the site has been successful. What has the feedback been?

Jari says: “The internal feedback from Stora Enso has been very good – the site is seen as a very fresh way of communicating sustainability in a credible manner. People who have seen the site are very impressed. In fact, Stora Enso’s Head of Communications Lauri Peltola was asked if it can be used as a CSR case study at the G20 summit. It has been an exceptionally powerful way of communicating – and demonstrating – how they do business.”

Stora Enso’s Global Responsibility microsite is clearly a great example of companies really ‘walking the talk” and using the power of new media technologies to approach CSR communications with transparency and credibility by making corporate CSR practices accessible for the average person.

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Trends in CSR Reporting http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2010/08/25/trends-in-csr-reporting/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2010/08/25/trends-in-csr-reporting/#comments Wed, 25 Aug 2010 18:58:53 +0000 Tara Knight http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/?p=144 I had the opportunity recently to do a bit of digging into best practices and trends for corporate responsibility reporting – and it was a fascinating journey. CSR (or ESG – Environmental, Social and Governance) concerns and reporting are clearly moving to the forefront of corporate agendas.

There are a few more obvious trends – corporate responsibility reporting formats are clearly headed away from large volume hard print copies and towards digital solutions such as websites and online formats as reports get more detailed. Finding easy-to-manage ways to organize large volumes of information is especially true for organizations using integrated reporting frameworks to incorporate financial and non-financial indicators into a single report. (A couple of excellent resources in this area are: Corporate Register’s CR Reporting Awards  and CSR Trends 3)

In the wake of a number of corporate actions which have publically (and dramatically) not met their CSR reputations, there is a lively debate about evaluating the breadth and credibility of corporate CSR reporting. With a more skeptical audience, there is a significant appetite for more transparency, independent verification of CSR reporting, and engaging stakeholder participation to validate key aspects of corporate CSR reports.

The Chartered Accountants of Canada recently released a report, Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Issues in Institutional Investor Decision Making, which provides another window into why these trends have become more prevalent. As investors are increasingly concerned with the environmental management aspects of CSR as a risk mitigation strategy, especially long-term investments, CSR (or ESG) reporting is also becoming critical data in making investment decisions. In fact, their report identifies that reporting on environmental, social and governance elements of the business are now being seen by some investors as a proxy for evaluating the quality of management of a company. Jennifer Hicks wrote about this growing interest in Triple Pundit.

Of course, this trend is frustrated by the lack of truly comparable metrics to evaluate CSR or ESG reporting between companies. Although the Global Reporting Initiative seems to be emerging as a favored standard, Corporate Register’s 2010 CR Reporting Awards report indicates the second most popular option is a completely customized reporting framework.   

For companies looking to initiate or improve their CSR (and ESG) reporting, making the choice between a global standard or custom framework will be difficult. A global reporting standard might enable their investors and stakeholders to perform better comparable analysis on their CSR performance relative to the market, where a custom reporting system could be a better fit to the company’s needs. In the meantime, companies should be conscious that reporting their CSR activity is critical not just for their corporate reputation – but potentially their financial success as well.

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CSR & The Stomach for Risk http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2010/07/06/csr-the-stomach-for-risk/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2010/07/06/csr-the-stomach-for-risk/#comments Tue, 06 Jul 2010 15:39:10 +0000 Tara Knight http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/?p=137 I was recently at a business networking event focused on arts and culture here in Vancouver. One of the speakers was the director of a theater company, and she told us a story of the perfect sponsorship – and her story struck me. I recently read a post from the Business Civic Leadership Center (BCLC) blog about how corporate citizenship was viewed by the public/business community (Katie Loovis: The Top Ten “Misperceptions” About CSR) and from my perspective, Katie was right on the money about the biggest misperceptions about CSR:

10. Can’t be trusted

9. A legal risk management tool

8. The ONLY job in the company where someone can make a difference

7. How the company supports the CEO’s favorite charity

6. A fad

5. Soft

4. One word – Greenwashing

3. Employee volunteerism, right?

2. PR

1. Philanthropy

The story of “the perfect donor” the theater company told at the event was interesting to me, because the donation of a local mining company would often be simply considered item #1 “philanthropy.” In this case, each year, a local mining company sponsors the development and production of new piece of theater.

For the theater company, the relationship was incredible – it was a stable source of funding that enabled their artists to freely create and explore, and its consistency supported their ability to plan and the financial freedom to develop (potentially) great theater.

Although my company represents a number of mining firms (though not this one), this partnership really caught my attention. What made this relationship interesting to me was why this mining company committed to donate every year – it was not primarily for philanthropy. They value the sponsorship for what it communicates about their core values as a company – the stomach to tackle risk.

The assumption and management of risk is an integral and unavoidable component of the mining business. In this case, it is a core value of their company. Each year they expose their business to significant risk exploring new resources, in business ventures, and pricing in the markets. It is fundamental to the culture of the organization that their employees and clients understand that some risks pay off, and some do not, but retaining the stomach to tackle risks is what continues to drive the company forward. It was the primary value they communicated to their team and their clients and suppliers every year by supporting bold and independent theater.

The theater company spoke quite passionately about how each year the company did not place any restrictions on what the theater piece would be, and hosted an opening night gala for their employees, VIP’s and clients. The theater company openly spoke about how some years the production was awful – and some years it was brilliant. For the artists, the donor’s willingness to support the creation of new theater, great or not great, enabled far greater freedom to explore and challenge new conceptions of their art.

As I listened to the story I thought of how many companies haven’t considered their community contributions this way – not just as being “good businesses” in the community (#1 philanthropy, but also arguably #’s 2, 5, & 7) – but taking the extra step of being a good business in the community and reinforcing their organization’s values though their community investments. For me, this is what CSR can mean – a relationship that realizes deeper benefits for everyone involved.

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Dilbert Always Gets It Right http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2009/07/14/dilbert-always-gets-it-right/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2009/07/14/dilbert-always-gets-it-right/#comments Tue, 14 Jul 2009 14:23:11 +0000 Boyd Neil http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/?p=27 Todays’ Dilbert cartoon by Scott Adams captures the zeitgeist of how some still view corporate responsibility and sustainability.

Dilbert.com

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We’re Back! http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2009/07/09/were-back/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2009/07/09/were-back/#comments Thu, 09 Jul 2009 18:38:49 +0000 Boyd Neil http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/?p=17 In 2007, the North American corporate responsibility (CR) team launched a blog on Collective Conversation called ResponsAbility, a play on words reflecting H&K’s unique and powerful ‘ability’ to help provide counsel on all facets of CR and CR communications. ResponsAbility featured original thinking, case studies and insights from H&K offices across North America, on a wide range of CR topics including employee volunteering, recycling, stakeholder engagement, privacy, green tech, and workplace diversity. (All of these posts have been migrated to this new platform and are accessible here.)

Although well received by clients and H&K colleagues alike, with posts attracting hundreds of views and trackbacks, the demands of keeping up a blog ran up against the business exigencies of day-to-day client service.

Well, ResponsAbility is back . . . with renewed commitment and energy and frankly a better infrastructure for ensuring the breadth and regularity of contributions. Why are we doing this? Because we have more and more clients coming to us for support on various facets of CR and sustainblity. We want to demonstrate that H&K’s CR consultants are among the brightest and most passionate counselors in this field. And we want to prove we deliver confirmed results.

From our perspective CR is much more than strategic philanthropy or “green” initiatives. So expect ResponsAbility to offer a broad range of posts covering everything from governance issues, employee engagement, impact on biodiversity, ethical behavior of sales forces, employee benefits, product quality and safety, CEO compensation, and energy efficiency . . . to responsible downsizing, supply chain working conditions, and responsible advertising and marketing to children.

Our goal is to make this the go-to source for the best thinking on corporate responsibility and sustainability.

You can help by subscribing to our RSS feed, adding ResponsAbility to your blog roll and insisting — by way of your comments, criticism and praise — that we make evident high standards in our thinking about, and our counsel on, these crticial business issues.

Boyd Neil . . . on behalf of Chad Tragakis and the North American CR team.

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Corporate Responsibility as Public Diplomacy http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2008/07/16/corporate-responsibility-as-public-diplomacy/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2008/07/16/corporate-responsibility-as-public-diplomacy/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2008 15:04:00 +0000 Boyd Neil http://blogs2.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/10950.aspx By Manuel Pauser, account executive in H&K’s Washington office.

As a 17-year-old I decided to live in Malaysia for a year, to immerse myself in another culture, learn the language, live with a local family and attend a local high school. At that time, I saw the year mainly as a benefit for me, for my family at home, and for my host family and friends in Malaysia. It had never crossed my mind that this cultural exchange could be a tool of foreign policy and diplomacy—to share and advocate German ideals abroad while bringing Malaysian values back to Germany.

Only a few years later, as a student of political science and international relations, I realized how crucial such programs are to foreign policy. Whereas traditional diplomacy—the art and practice of direct communication between political representatives of different countries—remains an integral part of foreign policy, public diplomacy has become increasingly important to the foreign policy efforts of the U.S. Department of State and other foreign ministries around the world.

Instead of reaching out to officials, public diplomacy programs seek to engage a wider audience in a non-political fashion. These programs provide a country with a human face abroad—something that is tangible for the public. Prominent examples include the Fulbright academic exchange program and the recent concert of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in North Korea.

Increasingly however, governments have realized that corporations and their corporate responsibility efforts can be part of public diplomacy strategies as well. Only a few weeks ago, the U.S. Department of State inaugurated its Benjamin Franklin Award for Public Diplomacy. The award recognizes the achievements of Americans who actively contribute to advancing America’s ideals through public diplomacy. In the category of corporations, Johnson & Johnson won the award for its Safe Kids Worldwide campaign, one that aims to educate the public and advocate for children’s safety at home and in school.

On another occasion, German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier announced that the German Federal Foreign Office, together with the Bertelsmann Foundation, planned to set up an internet platform to highlight best practices in corporate responsibility among German companies at home and abroad. Embassies will provide background information on countries and confer on-the-ground insights regarding companies’ cooperation with the local public.

In both cases, corporate responsibility as public diplomacy is viewed as a new way to create understanding and appreciation for other cultures, while establishing a dialogue between people of different nationalities. Subsidiaries of companies in other countries tend to resemble the culture of that parent company, the quality of products and production processes, the relationship between management and workforce, and the relationship with local communities.

Each case also indicates that diplomacy not only serves businesses, but businesses can serve diplomacy as well. For the past decades, it has been common practice for country officials to travel on official diplomatic visits accompanied by representatives from the business community. Such trips help to build and strengthen economic ties with other countries and serve businesses.

Businesses, in turn, can provide grounds for closer diplomatic relations and increased collaboration. With strong corporate responsibility engagements abroad, businesses can help build and expand powerful ties among the publics and people, while at the same time, enhancing the image of their home countries.

Corporate responsibility is part of public diplomacy. And public diplomacy becomes an integral part of corporate responsibility strategies. Even though we are still miles away from a fully integrated relationship between public diplomacy and corporate responsibility, I am glad to observe that governments around the world are beginning to recognize that corporations can assist diplomacy efforts by conveying the ideals and values of their home countries abroad.

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Transgender Protection in the Workplace – PART ONE http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2008/06/06/transgender-protection-in-the-workplace-part-one/ http://blogs.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/2008/06/06/transgender-protection-in-the-workplace-part-one/#comments Fri, 06 Jun 2008 15:06:00 +0000 Boyd Neil http://blogs2.hillandknowlton.com/responsability/10782.aspx by Michelle Tsai, senior account supervisor for the corporate group in the New York office. 

This is the first of a two-part post on equal protection for transgender employees in the workplace.

When I started my communications career in the early 1990s at the Texas Department of Transportation as a public information officer, my boss told me there was an unwritten rule that women were discouraged from wearing pants in the office, by fiat of the district engineer.  But, she said, things were better than when she started her career in the 1970s, when women who flouted this rule were actually sent home to change! 

We’ve come a long way indeed.

Interestingly, this example of our shifting attitudes toward sex stereotypes (i.e. that women wear skirts and men wear pants) has become a factor again with regard to non-gender conformist individuals increasingly present in the workplace.  This group includes transgender men and women, people who are transitioning or have already transitioned to a different sex than they were assigned at birth; and intersex individuals, those born with genetic anomalies that can cause impaired development of secondary sex characteristics.  But this group also includes individuals who simply are more comfortable with challenging traditional sex stereotypes, such as men with long hair, or women who don’t wear makeup.

In order to fully understand the issue, it’s important to make a distinction between three separate concepts: gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation.  Gender identity is your own internal feelings of being male, female, both or neither.  Gender expression is how you present yourself externally to the world, whether masculine, feminine or androgynous.  Sexual orientation is your preference for a partner based on your physical, emotional and spiritual connection to the gender qualities of another person, and is usually described as being gay, lesbian or bisexual.

Public attitudes and legal protection of transgender employees varies widely throughout the world, with Canada and Europe generally more liberal and the Middle East generally more conservative.  Currently, there is no federal law in the United States that explicitly prohibits discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlaws hiring or employment discrimination on the basis of the employee’s “race, color, religion, sex, or national origin,” but does not mention sexual orientation, much less gender identity.

Early court decisions held that transgender people were not entitled to protection from employment discrimination under Title VII. More recently, however, a new line of cases, based on intervening U.S. Supreme Court decisions, may provide protection for LGBT people in some situations. 

In my next post, we’ll look at one landmark Supreme Court case almost 20 years ago that continues to impact gender identity law today, and take a look at the progress we’ve made in establishing equal rights for LGBT employees in the workplace.

 

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