The opportunity of international name recognition

While visiting Argentina it is noticeable that many of the sporting stars who appear daily in the national media are very familiar to a British sports fan. This instant name recognition brings an opportunity which may not be fully recognised.

In the 21 October issue of Olé, the popular national sports newspaper, there were stories about Barcelona icon Lionel Messi, the Argentinian rugby team preparing for their forthcoming tour of the UK, rising tennis star Juan Martín del Potro and numerous pages previewing the weekend’s local derby between Boca Juniors and River Plate.

The focus for sponsors and rights-holders is often the country where a sporting competition is taking place but the media coverage can spread much further, depending on the nationalities of the participants. This has long been appreciated in Formula 1, where the nationality of drivers is a significant factor when teams decide who to hire. Football and basketball clubs are also well aware that a star name from overseas can help the fan base to grow in a new market - consider Beckham at LA Galaxy or Park Ji-Sung at Mancheter United.

However, the potential is much greater. It is perfectly plausible for a sponsor or rights-holder to create an event featuring hand-picked athletes or teams from specific markets. More often it seems to happen the other way around: the fact that a particular athlete or team is involved suddenly makes an event more attractive for a potential sponsor. Purists will understandably be concerned that qualification might be determined by a sponsor’s needs rather than on merit. Clearly there needs to be a balance between open and invitation-only competitions because fans will readily ignore meaningless contests.

At a time when many sporting bodies are under economic pressure, sponsors can be a little bolder in their negotiations. Even if they don’t go as far as creating their own event they may be able to influence  qualification criteria to increase the chances of key athletes or teams participating. 

For governing bodies and other rights-holders, uneasy at the prospect of having sponsors closely involved in their events, it is more important than ever to increase the depth and range of potential winners. If they succeed they will have a much stronger proposition to offer international brands. Unfortunately it’s easier said than done.

Football, rugby, tennis, basketball, volleyball and golf are therefore fortunate that the strength of Argentina’s athletes assures interest in their national media. However that doesn’t stop the Brazilians poking fun at their rivals’ struggle to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

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