Levis Drops Pants With Twitter

10 June 2009

I’m of course on Twitter (@ryanpeal) and have had a lot of fun watching to see how brands are using the new fun to engage with people in a number of ways.  I’ve seen brands simply trying to sell stuff (like Dell), those trying to provide customer care (like Telstra BigPond) and some just trying to show the fun side of their brands (like Zappos).  Today I came across a new way to use Twitter – pant dropping!

A few weeks ago Levis in Australia and New Zealand started sending out people wearing new Levis and twittering about it with their iSpy Levis Twitter campaign.  Ok nothing out of the ordinary yet.  The catch, if you follow the campaign by Levis on Twitter you will see that their tweets are clues on where they are, providing photos and narrative of things around them, helping you track them down.  Why would you want to track them down, to get a free pair of jeans!  If you follow the tweets and hunt down your prey and ask “are those levis?” – magic will happen – instantly the people will drop their pants and give them to you right on the spot (putting a smile on your face like the winner above, Jimmy Curtis).  I’m guessing in reality you get a pair that is your size but you never know down under – may be forced to squeeze into some jeans but at least they are free.

A great example to share with clients and colleagues of how Twitter can add some personality and fun to your brand and have you actually engage with real, live people in the process.  Great work Levis!

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5 Responses to “Levis Drops Pants With Twitter”

  1. Stephanie

    As a PR student who was initially skeptical of Twitter’s benefits, I recently began embracing it and appreciate learning how it is successfully utilized by PR practitioners. The Levis campaign proves that social media is sparking new creativity, becoming a major trend for PR campaigns. One downside PR practitioners should be aware of when utilizing Twitter, is the exclusion of other potential markets because of Twitter’s predominantly younger user demographic. Research on the target audience is as important as also explaining to clients the time commitment required in the constant monitoring of successful social media campaigns.

  2. Clare Devlin

    I think a particularly successful PR strategy arises when social media is leveraged to stimulate conversations with the brand’s key influencers, rather than being targeted at an undefined audience. Levis is well on its way to determining its key influencers through this campaign: the people willing to follow hints and participate in an “iSpy” type of hunt are likely the people who love this brand of jeans and who will talk about them with their peers. I would encourage Levis to keep the conversations (both online and face-to-face) going with these individuals, in order to create a word of mouth buzz about their current and upcoming products.

  3. Sam Bailey

    Young mobile audiences pose a challenge to marketers. Plugged into many different sources, this audience demand products that have a portability factor and what is more portable than the clothes on your back?

    Twitter’s potential as a marketing tool is only now being utilized. Until recently, Twitter has been all sizzle and no steak but Levis gives a notable lesson on the power of engaging audiences to interact on and offline. All while keeping the Levis brand top of mind with their target market. Besides, who doesn’t love a free pair of jeans? Kudos to Levis!

  4. Clare

    Thanks for posting about this, Ryan. I think a particularly successful PR strategy arises when social media is leveraged to stimulate conversations with the brand’s key influencers, rather than being targeted at an undefined audience. (See Richard Edelman’s blog at http://www.edelman.com/speak_up/blog/). Levis is well on its way to determining its key influencers through this campaign: the people willing to follow hints and participate in an “iSpy” type of hunt are likely the people who love this brand of jeans and who will talk about them with their peers. I would encourage Levis to keep the conversations (both online and face-to-face) going with these individuals, in order to create a word of mouth buzz about their current and upcoming products.

  5. christie hill

    This campaign is a brilliant tactic to engage Levi (and non-Levi) consumers. While Twitter users and Tweets are increasing exponentially, a contest or games like this generate mass coverage and interest. I know I try to get caught up on Twitter as often as I can, but it is difficult to read all the Tweets that sometimes it is easy to lose track. Since people are updating so often, it is necessary to reinforce your message so it does not go unnoticed.
    If individuals are having so much success delivering their messages, it makes sense that companies are taking advantage of the social phenomenon to advertise sales and new products! I, as an avid shopper thrive off the tweets that are keeping me informed.
    Levi’s concept of the iSpy game is fun and keeps followers coming back. It’s engaging, yes but what an easy way to get your message out to the masses and getting free products entices everyone!

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