Posts Tagged ‘Budget’

FPS’ Friday Friday

Image credit: Creative Commons/ su-lin

1. Just when we thought Granny tax ruled the “Best _______ tax” name, this week the press (and Twitter) had a field day with the pasty tax saga. The surprise budget announcement sparked a threat of a bakers’ march led by the head of bakery at Greggs. According to the Guardian, an online petition has already been set up on Downing Street’s scheme by bakers’ trade associations. Sign up here.

2. Not content with scoring the own goals that were pasty-gate, grannytax and the donor-row, the Government proceeded to exacerbate their worst week ever and add fuel to the flames of a pending petrol crisis that never materialised, despite Francis Maude’s best efforts.

3. The question on everyone’s lips is “Are we back in recession?” The answer is it depends on who you’re speaking to. Latest OECD figures reveal that the economy has shrunk for the second quarter, but according to predictions from Office for Budget Responsibility, the UK will avoid a recession with the economy growing by just 0.8 per cent over the course of 2012.

4. A giant step for the Eurozone but a small step for the global economy as the European Union confirmed the extension of the European bailout fund. The total funds available has now reached €700bn.

5. And on that note, I leave you with this video from the OECD with its latest Interim Economic Assessment on the global economy

Post contributors: Nick Woods, Edward Jones

The Best of the Budget

posted by Edward Jones

Rather than the usual Friday Fiver, this week we have decided to look at the Budget. Shock horror. Rather than add to the millions of words of analysis already published on that topic, we thought we’d make your lives easier and point you to the most memorable elements of this week’s main event.

Best Analysis

The IFS’ Budget 2012 briefing yesterday cut through the hyperbole to deliver a sober assessment of the red book. Their analysis of the implications of the 50p tax rate, suggested that contrary to the mooted 300,000 extra taxpayers roped into the lower 40p tax rate threshold, this figure could actually be closer to a million by 2014, adding fuel to the flames that were already raging, particularly among the usually supportive right wing media. 

A mention should also go to the Economist’s analysis. Highlighting Britain’s expertise in high-value services and the need to attract the world’s brightest, the Economist applauded Osbourne’s efforts to signal, “about as clearly as a man with no money to spare can, that Britain is open for business”.

Best gag

Sending the Government bench into raptures and consequently, Lindsay Hoyle, the Deputy Speaker, into apoplexy, Osbourne, when announcing tax breaks for the animation and video game industry in reference to this well know cartoon sketch said: “It is this Government’s determined policy that we keep Wallace and Gromit exactly where they are“. BOOM!

Best Headline

The Sun could’ve won this thrice with some absolute beauties including: “HE’S TAKING US FOR FUELS” and “GRAN THEFT OSBO.” The best ones are captured in this image courtesy of Conservative Home’s @TimMontgomerie

Best Post Budget Admission

‘We hid the papers.’ The Prime Minister’s aide unveils to the Times, Number 10’s response to the negative headlines on Thursday.

Best Punch

Miliband’s 50p tax gibe at the Government. With one question – ‘Who on the front bench would benefit personally from the 50p tax cut?’ Ed stunned the Cabinet and made his point effortlessly; we are no longer all in this together. Very clever.  

Best PR

The anti-war protesters – who employed a very, very long handle on their ‘stop the killing in Iraq and Afghanistan’ sign, which meant every interview Jon Sopel gave on College Green featured that banner in the background.

Best ‘_______ tax’ name

Whilst the half-baked pasty tax made a valiant effort, the Granny tax is set to be the classic. As a closing gambit, we quite like this spin on the Granny tax from the daily mash.

Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

1. In a late breaking development, FSA regulatory chief Hector Sants announced his resignation from the soon to be disbanded organisation. It’s an unfortunate end to a week when the FSA successfully stung another trader for insider trading. Where next for Hector? Some are already suggesting a high profile role in industry awaits.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

2. Budget fever grew nicely, with more leaks from Treasury than there are hangers-on at an Only Way is Essex party. In no particular order, scrapping pensions tax relief, scrapping the 50p tax rate, issuing absurdly long-dated bonds, tax breaks for the TV and film industry and raising the income tax threshold towards £10,000.

3. Following on from point number one, it seems insider trading is a crime, but one that is only punishable by removing half a bonus. Then again, based on this, the key to insider trading really is as simple as playing a popular after-dinner game with your client over the (recorded) landline at your desk.

4. Hell of a week for Tesco losing its UK boss and telling its employees they’ll have to work two years longer before they retire – on the latter they’re to be applauded for addressing the issue sooner rather than later, many more are likely to follow.

5.  Fitch joined Moody’s this week to put the UK economy on a negative outlook threatening the AAA rating. Some have said it’s a gift for George Osbourne before the budget as it will set the tone for continued austerity. Indeed the agencies have been clear that any deviation from austerity would be more disconcerting. Ed Balls’ line however, that you should never set policy by the credit ratings agencies might just get some traction, particularly given the criticisms they face.

FPS’ Friday Fiver

Hello All! And welcome to our brand new, dedicated Financial Services blog from our FPS team here at H&K. This blog will cover all things related to finance, money, the economy, politics, consumer trends and probably a bit of humour along the way. We hope you enjoy reading it and look forward to your comments.

In the meantime, here’s this week’s Friday Five with contributions from Ed, Ross and Marie.

George Osborne's Budget has generally been well received, but more pain lies ahead

Two days on from the Budget…There’s always a mad rush to get initial reaction out on Budget Day. Two days on though, where do we stand? Our initial reaction remains largely the same – George Osborne delivered a Budget for business and one designed for growth. The question though is at what cost.

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