Posts Tagged ‘FSA’

Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

1. In a late breaking development, FSA regulatory chief Hector Sants announced his resignation from the soon to be disbanded organisation. It’s an unfortunate end to a week when the FSA successfully stung another trader for insider trading. Where next for Hector? Some are already suggesting a high profile role in industry awaits.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

2. Budget fever grew nicely, with more leaks from Treasury than there are hangers-on at an Only Way is Essex party. In no particular order, scrapping pensions tax relief, scrapping the 50p tax rate, issuing absurdly long-dated bonds, tax breaks for the TV and film industry and raising the income tax threshold towards £10,000.

3. Following on from point number one, it seems insider trading is a crime, but one that is only punishable by removing half a bonus. Then again, based on this, the key to insider trading really is as simple as playing a popular after-dinner game with your client over the (recorded) landline at your desk.

4. Hell of a week for Tesco losing its UK boss and telling its employees they’ll have to work two years longer before they retire – on the latter they’re to be applauded for addressing the issue sooner rather than later, many more are likely to follow.

5.  Fitch joined Moody’s this week to put the UK economy on a negative outlook threatening the AAA rating. Some have said it’s a gift for George Osbourne before the budget as it will set the tone for continued austerity. Indeed the agencies have been clear that any deviation from austerity would be more disconcerting. Ed Balls’ line however, that you should never set policy by the credit ratings agencies might just get some traction, particularly given the criticisms they face.

FPS’ Friday Fiver

Happy weekend all! It’s been an incredibly busy week in our financial and professional services team this week, handling everything from the forthcoming surge in Christmas shopping, to understanding the world’s expats just a little bit more. Speaking of Christmas, it’s now just one month away – something our resident Christmas Enthusiast, Karen, reminds us of thanks to this handy iPhone app every single day.

Sadly, there isn’t actually a whole amount of Christmas cheer around at the moment, particularly not if you live in Europe, or indeed the US, as Ross blogged on yesterday. With that in mind this week’s Friday Fiver covers off the continuing economic situation, as well as changes for UK bank customers, and two of the biggest video games of all time. Enjoy, and happy weekend.

BYE BYE FREE MONEY…..When is a free bank account not free? Pretty much always in the opinion of the Financial Services Authority. According to this morning’s Financial Times, the financial regulator is of the belief that free current bank accounts have “distorted the landscape and led to damaging decisions about what products are available”. In other words, the costs of providing free current accounts have been made up elsewhere by retail banks charging higher fees for other services (and by selling occasionally dubious products such as PPI).

The result of all this? The FSA believes that customers should be charged for their current account to negate this problem. It may appear a controversial idea, but the UK is something of an anomaly on bank accounts in the West – lots of other countries charge for this service, albeit at a low level, so we shouldn’t really be surprised that charging may happen here too. That would certainly make starting a retail bank far easier, something Metro and Virgin would probably welcome. Any move is likely to require concerted action though – as the FT also noted, if one bank were to unilaterally start charging, customers would simply get up and walk down the road to a ‘free’ competitor.

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FPS’ Friday Fiver

Hello All! It’s been another very heavy week of news, and equally heavy rain here in London – will summer ever raise its head again? Given the weather is playing havoc with any outdoor plans for the next few hours, we’ve put together another series of five key stories of the week from the world of financial and professional services. Thanks as ever to Ed, Mel and Jo for their contributions.

When is a default not a default?…Here are two rather intriguing and perhaps contradictory headlines for you from the same news website today: ‘Greece deal sparks bank-led European share rally‘, and ‘Fitch declares Greece default‘.

Greece - lives to fight another day

So which is it? The answer, rather confusingly, is both, depending on who you listen to. What isn’t in doubt is that eurozone countries have agreed another bailout package for Greece (though some have their doubts as to whether it’s big enough). This in turn, has sparked a market rally.

What also isn’t in doubt though, is that ratings agency Fitch have declared that because the deal involves private lenders ‘taking a haircut‘ on some of their debt, Greece has undergone a ‘restricted default’. At least in part. Confused? Quite possibly. What does it mean? That Greece continues to rage against the dieing of the light for a little longer, and that the other PIGS get some brief respite as well.

UPDATE – It seems we may have spoken too soon. According to Channel 4’s Economics Editor, Faisal Islam, Fitch is now not declaring Greece to be in restricted default.

Britain’s economy 2011 – what might we think in 2021?…What will be made of the Government’s economic policy in years to come? Will George Osborne’s approach be heralded as a masterstroke which got the nation back on its feet or criticised for paralysing the economy, engendering neither deficit reduction nor economic growth?

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FPS’ Friday Fiver

Yes, it’s back. After a break for the Easter holiday, some glorious weather and that dress, we return with the Financial and Professional Services team’s Friday Fiver. We also have a fresh contributor this week, our new regulatory and government expert, Melanie Worthy. Other pieces this week come from regulars Ed Jones, Ross G, Karen and myself.

Crunch time for RBS and the FSA…The Treasury Select Committee and the FSA announced this week that they’ve asked City heavyweight Sir David Walker and lawyer Bill Knight to conduct an independent review of the report the FSA is producing into the failure of RBS. They will examine whether the report fairly reflects the findings of the FSA’s investigation of RBS, as well as analysis of its own regulatory activities.

Sir David Walker - charged with reviewing the demise of RBS (image from guardian.co.uk)

Walker’s unique attributes of being both a credible City figure plus a trusted Government adviser make him an obvious choice for the role. His track record helps too – he has headed Government enquiries, such as in 2009 when he examined governance at the big UK banks.

Just as well then, as he’s going to have his work cut out. However “complex” the issues were, as the FSA cites somewhat reluctantly, there will be strong media interest and expectation for answers as to the causes of RBS’ demise; the excessive cost to the public purse from bailout; and the wider malaise that played out across the banking sector as the financial crisis ensued.  Whilst Walker and Knight tread through a minefield to avoid the legal conflicts to RBS employees, they’ll be mindful of the need to show teeth and forensic review on both sides of the regulatory fence.

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