Posts Tagged ‘FT’

FPS’ Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

This is the last time in 2012 I say this – Happy New Year! I hope you all had a good Christmas but now it’s done let’s look forward to what will no doubt be a memorable year, in many ways, most of which Dr Doom will relish, but many of which are truly historic. Here is our first fiver of the year.

Probably the best recovery of any opposition party in history

So the Labour Party hasn’t had the best of weeks. In fact on Thursday it really didn’t have the best of days. Firstly, Lord Glasman, adviser to Ed Miliband, gifted the tories and the so-called ’Miliband hunters’ in the Labour Party with a stinging critique of the Labour leader’s, err, leadership. Shortly after this excitement, Diane Abbott kicked up a storm over comments she made on twitter, later interrupting an interview on Sky News to take a call from Ed Miliband himself, who proceeded to give Abbott a ‘severe dressing down.’ The icing on the cake was a leaked strategy document script for broadcast (according to Labour HQ), which is worth a read, if you haven’t already (P1 & P2), and yes, it does include those fateful words in the above subtitle.     

Count the cars

No doubt you’re bored of hearing about Europe and the mess our inter-dependent economies now find themselves in. The simple fact of the matter is, the problems are not over, and 2012 is set for more of the same.

Singing a different tune at the end of 2011 however, Sam Jones, the FT’s Hedge Fund Correspondent penned an intriguing piece about the lengths hedge fund managers go to find out what they are investing in. The crux of the article was that all may not be quite as rosy as it seems in the East and that problems may lurk within the Chinese economy. Hedge fund managers have dispatched intelligence gatherers to factory gates to “count the cars” and ensure official figures match realities on the ground.

Image: http://thefederalist-gary.blogspot.com/2011/07/real-estate-bubble-chinas-ghost-towns.html

The article also linked to a video of hedge fund manager Hugh Hendry dating back to 2009 on a jaunt amongst seemingly empty Chinese skyscrapers pondering who is actually going to rent these steel giants. Both the article and the video are worthy of five minutes of your attention.

Top 50 Most Valuable Brands in China

Moving seemlessly from empty skyscrapers to those who might fill them.

Click on the image – Simples!

Old hacks new tricks

After tweeting this in error, Sky’s crime correspondent Martin Brunt gave a quick lesson in how to shut down an embarrassing moment with this swift response.

Tweet that

A precise report which helpfully landed in our inbox earlier today revealed the following:

Who ‘owns’ your company’s Twitter followers?

A US firm is suing a former employee who took 17,000 Twitter followers with him when he left the company. PhoneDog Media is seeking damages of up to USD370,000 from Noah Kravitz after claiming the costs and resources invested in its followers and fans were substantial. Kravitz speaks to TheDroidGuy about the dispute and says the company never asked for the Twitter account back and suggested he could tweet on its behalf. In contrast, PhoneDog president Tom Klein says the Twitter account was created to promote PhoneDog content and to give fans a chance to follow Noah ‘as a representative of the company’. The New Statesman says the case could have far-reaching legal implications regarding the value of social media and its users and how intellectual property law has adapted to the emergence of social media. The outcome could also influence how companies choose to use and invest in such technology in future.

It is an interesting development, and follows (to some extent) the debacle around Twitter account ownership of Laura Kuenssberg, who you may remember, moved from the BBC to ITV taking some 60,000 followers with her. The central question (or one of them) being are you following the tweeter due to the specific interest you may have in them as a person, or because of the inherent brand association they enjoy thanks to their role i.e., were you following Laura Kuenssberg, or the BBC ‘s Chief Political Correspondent?

Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

For this week’s festive fill of Friday fun from the FPS team, sorry, I’ll stop with the Fs now. This week’s 5r below…

UK goes alone over Europe

Picture: BBC

It looks like the Prime Minister, David Cameron, has bowed to domestic pressure at the expense of international, or at least European influence. The history of Europe and the Conservative party looms large over his decision, but it does appear to represent an element of weakness in his leadership which wasn’t there before. The PM’s detractors are getting increasingly confident, backbench MPs were particularly vocal in PMQs this week, and one commentator even questioned what the odds might be on all party leaders being in present position by the time of the next election; at the moment it feels like an appealing bet. At least Cameron can take heart in Labour’s travails which it seems, according to the latest opinion polls, are getting worse.   

Christmas on the High Street

Every year it seems to get later. Logically you’d think that the busiest day on the high street would be mid-December, to allow time to wrap gifts and because people are keen to avoid the last minute dash.

Guess the road...

In reality, the busiest shopping periods over the past few years have been shifting towards the 22nd, 23rd or even 24th Dec as our client Visa showed last year, with 23 December being the peak. Christmas arouses the best of our consumerism, but even that has finally been dampened by high inflation and low or no wage growth. Why is this? Firstly, there’s the economic situation. Secondly, is the knock on effect of this dampening – retailers have to work extra hard to get us into shops. Discounting is the most effective way to do this but this presents a problem – discount too soon and your margins shrink. With big stock bills and rent to pay, its hard to afford that for long. So begins a game of poker between retailer and customer – the retailer always blinks first, it’s just a question of when.

It can’t be! Some good news…

In a rebuff to Dr Doom, the UK’s export market is apparently staging a come back. According to ONS statistics published today the value of UK’s exports have hit a record high and we’ve been importing less, meaning a narrowing trade deficit. Chemicals, medical products, and telecoms equipment performed particularly strongly in what will be seen as a boost to the Government, UKTI and the Department for Business who are banging the drum on this increasingly loudly. In last week’s Autumn statement the Government allocated £10 million to help mid-size British businesses export and £35 million to double, from 25,000 to 50,000, the number of SMEs that UKTI supports each year.  Analysts have cautiously welcomed the news, but the Government will be delighted.

There’s an app for that

You may have noticed, but the Fiver team are rather fond of the FT. On Tuesday everybody’s favourite pink paper launched an app for Android, which will replace the slightly clunky web browser version. We’ll await the Apple version with anticipation. If anyone has got round to downloading the new app, we’d be interested to hear what you think.

Osborne and Balls get in the Festive spirit

George Osborne and Ed Balls

Enough said.

FPS’ Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

Known unknowns…

Frank Portnoy, Professor of Law at the University of San Diego has written a fantastic article in today’s FT on market uncertainty, rogues, risk taking and trust in banks. The best we’ve seen and rather frightening, Dr Doom would be proud, because ultimately, however much we regulate, we are only basing decisions on what has happened in the past, rather than what could happen in the future – i.e, Greece defaulting.

Every picture tells a story…

Photograph: Dan Kitwood/Getty

Read the rest of this entry »

‘The first in an occasional series…’

posted by Edward Jones

I thought I’d kick off the week, and indeed my contributions to Hill & Knowlton’s new FPS (Financial and Professional Services – for those still wondering) team blog ‘Shocks & Stares’, with a brief post, drawing your attention to the Financial Times’ Elections 2011 feature and more importantly the excellent little graphic on page 2 of today’s FT (and below).  The feature highlights the importance of May 5th in shaping the political landscape for the remainder of this Parliament and beyond. Much like this post, ‘this is the first in an occasional series on the May 5th elections’ from the FT so we look forward to the next instalment, especially if they contain more infographics like the one below.

Financial Times 'Elections 2011' infographic - Monday April 11 2011, page 2