Posts Tagged ‘infographic’

Do you remember your first car?

A question that has sparked quite the conversation amongst the team as we shared stories about our old, but much loved, bangers from the days of our youth.

We’ve had a couple of Renault Clios that are not without their battery and engine ailments, a rundown Morris Minor and a clapped out Rover 200 – no brakes, a dodgy handbrake but a great stereo.

What prompted our nostalgia? This handy infographic from Aviva (cl) on top ten first cars of all time and accompanying story on the changing face of your typical first car owner. It looks like we weren’t the only ones inspired by the story as the Daily Mail, Sun, Telegraph, Daily Star and Evening Standard all took their own spin on it (no pun intended).

Car infographic

What was your first car?

FPS’ Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

Known unknowns…

Frank Portnoy, Professor of Law at the University of San Diego has written a fantastic article in today’s FT on market uncertainty, rogues, risk taking and trust in banks. The best we’ve seen and rather frightening, Dr Doom would be proud, because ultimately, however much we regulate, we are only basing decisions on what has happened in the past, rather than what could happen in the future – i.e, Greece defaulting.

Every picture tells a story…

Photograph: Dan Kitwood/Getty

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FPS’ Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

Nearly the weekend. First, here is this week’s Friday Fiver…

Thanks to DC, Daisy, Rachel and Nick for contributions.

Is the economy looking up?…

Economic figures this week were better than predicted, but is this just a pause for breath before the storm?

Here’s a question for you. If GDP growth is so flat (or even in reverse as it was last winter), then how can it be that unemployment fell according to the latest figures? Wednesday’s announcement from the ONS stated that total unemployment was down from 8% to 7.8%. Here’s another question for you as well. If global commodity price rises (particularly food and oil) are showing no sign of slowing down, then how can it be that inflation fell against most predictions according to the latest figures? The ONS’ figures on Tuesday recorded a drop in the Consumer Price Index from 4.4% in February to just 4.0% in March.

So what’s going on? Well, the fall in unemployment was definitely welcome, but it may be shortlived. The reason for this is the continued fear that new jobs created in the private sector may not be able to keep up with the large redundancies likely being made in the public sector as the government trims spending – it’s a bit like pouring water into a bucket at the top, and it flowing out through holes in the bottom; the problem is, we can’t pour water in fast enough.

And on inflation? Well, it turns out that we can thank retailers, and especially supermarkets, for the slight fall in inflation. According to the ONS, the level of discounting by shops is at an all time high as they try to maintain the flow of customers in through their doors (this might explain why my local Co-op has been running a 50% off wine promotion almost non-stop since Christmas). The question is, how long will these promotions continue to entice consumers? Especially when growth in wages continues to lag behind inflation, reducing the amount of disposable income we have to spend on the high street.

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‘The first in an occasional series…’

posted by Edward Jones

I thought I’d kick off the week, and indeed my contributions to Hill & Knowlton’s new FPS (Financial and Professional Services – for those still wondering) team blog ‘Shocks & Stares’, with a brief post, drawing your attention to the Financial Times’ Elections 2011 feature and more importantly the excellent little graphic on page 2 of today’s FT (and below).  The feature highlights the importance of May 5th in shaping the political landscape for the remainder of this Parliament and beyond. Much like this post, ‘this is the first in an occasional series on the May 5th elections’ from the FT so we look forward to the next instalment, especially if they contain more infographics like the one below.

Financial Times 'Elections 2011' infographic - Monday April 11 2011, page 2