Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

The Bank of England & 9 other economists you should follow on Twitter

It seems the heart of the City has finally embraced social media, as word spread this morning of the Bank of England’s new Twitter feed. One can only picture Governor Mervyn King typing away at his desk, or perhaps on his smartphone providing updates on the latest data coming out of the Bank’s finest economic minds.

Or perhaps not, given that the Governor probably has his mind on other things, what with announcing that the printing presses will be whirring into action to the tune of £75bn of quantitative easing.

With today’s decision likely to dominate the domestic agenda for the next couple of days, here are 9 journalists worth following on Twitter to get your daily economic dose:

Ed Conway – Sky’s Economics Editor, @EdConwaySky

Faisal Islam – Channel 4’s Economics Editor, @faisalislam

Paul Mason – Newsnight’s Economics Editor, @paulmasonnews

Steve Hawkes – The Sun’s Business Editor, @steve_hawkes

Allister Heath – City AM’s Editor, @AllisterHeath

David Smith – The Sunday Times’ Economics Editor, @dsmitheconomics

James Mackintosh – The FT’s Investment Editor, @jmackin2

Jeremy Warner – The Telegraph’s Business Columnist, @jeremywarnerUK

Stephanie Flanders – The BBC’s Economics Editor, @BBCStephanie

Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

Friday Fiver

Soon to be called the Saturday Fiver if we post this any later, please see our take on this week’s news below. Never ones to go for the obvious, we’ve shied away from adding further comment to the ICB’s final report, instead looking at the possibility of a break up of the EU, the anniversary of Lehman’s and the shadow it still casts over our financial markets, the Daily Mail’s new website, a twitter storm at Topman and stat of the week! Massive thanks to Coffey Clare Coffey, Claire Scott, Sallie Bale, Matt Bright and Linzi Goldthorpe for this week’s contributions.

Here they are…

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FPS’ Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

Welcome to our Friday Fiver. This week we look at Nick Clegg’s proposals for public ownership of bailed out banks, the ever growing tech bubble and cybercrime, whilst we shift effortlessly from speaking to ourselves in the first person to a collective, as our minds wonder what the weekend might hold. With a few nuggets of information at the very end – so worth reading all the way through!

Thanks to Ben, Dave and Jo for contributions.

The People’s Bank…

It’s not often that ‘I agree with Nick’. But despite the naysayers who say that it’s pie in the sky, the administration of such a project would be impossible, or that Nick Clegg is only mentioning it now to get himself some press attention while he travels in Brazil, I have to say I like the idea of those who bailed out the banks getting something back. I also like the idea of reintroducing share ownership to the public at large because it goes some way to bridging the gap between what people perceive of financial services and equity ownership and reality.

It also helps with the financial education theme which is so popular amongst politicians and financial services companies, but rarely actually really delivers change because at the end of the day it is a one way message. Repeated surveys show the public never really engage or feel comfortable with finance, however well intentioned the various programmes are that exist. If they owned shares, they would pay attention, they would engage, they would also probably make some money in this instance, and get something back for the tax revenue they provided to the banks.

Surely that is worth further investigation?

The bubble keeps growing…

We’ve written before about the soaring valuations of tech companies, and in particular, social media companies. The likes of Facebook, Twitter, Groupon and Foursquare have seen their potential values skyrocket as investors queue up to get a piece of any potential IPO. We (or to be blunt, Dave) have been somewhat sceptical about the value being placed on these businesses, chiefly because the profits most of them are making are barely correlated to the huge valuations put on them.

Over the past week, we’ve had two more cases in point. The first is Pandora, an online music and radio service based in the USA. It floated for $2.6bn mid last week, and its value briefly soared above $4bn according to an in-depth article about this issue in Tuesday’s FT. The second is Shazam, which secured $32m in new funding from venture capitalists on Wednesday. This means a float is unlikely for a while, but it didn’t stop ‘sources’ claiming the company “was now worth hundreds of millions of dollars” according to an FT blog.

The missing element here? Profits. Shazam is making them, but only just, whilst Pandora hasn’t made one yet, and its current revenues of $110m are a tiny fraction of its valuation.

This sceptic remains unconvinced I’m afraid….

Cyber crime

The threat of ‘cybercrime’ loomed large this week after news of the arrest of a 19 year-old hacker suspected of carrying out attacks on the C.I.A and the UK’s serious organised crime agency. After the WikiLeaks saga and arrest of NASA hacker Gary McKinnon it would seem that security agencies are struggling to keep a handle on…well, security. But this isn’t just any security, the issue of ‘cyberspace’ is a particularly tricky one as currently there is no transnational law to define what happens next.

This is an issue policy makers have been keen to address since the National Security Strategy identified cybercrime as a tier one priority risk.

But the question remains, how do we control this vast and intangible area? In the FT this week former British cabinet minister John Reid says innovation is the key to cracking the cyber crisis. What is needed, says Reid, is an ‘elite cadre of innovators able to lead a workforce with a different, entrepreneurial ethos’. We’d like to think they might look like this.

Anyone up for the job..?

Summer Solstice

June 21 saw the longest day and shortest night of the year and despite this marking the official beginning of the summer season it also means that from now on our days will be getting shorter and our nights longer and we might as well all be starting to get ready for Christmas.

But for those of us who haven’t yet embraced the summer months you might want to have a look at Visa Europe’s (client) Third Annual Travel Report which revealed that holidaymaking Britons are increasingly venturing out of the eurozone. Visa Europe analysed international spend trends of 105 million UK cardholders to reveal the countries with the highest annual increase in consumer spend in 2010. While Zimbabwe tops the list, fellow African countries, Gambia (4th), Nigeria (5th) and Morocco (10th) all featured in the top ten.

Definitely food for thought if you haven’t yet planned your summer getaway, but if you would like to keep your feet on home turf, you might want to try and find some at Glastonbury this weekend, which despite its muddy start, festival goers are expected to enjoy the hottest day of the year on Sunday! Excellent.

On the theme of live music…

And fitting for a Friday afternoon, we’ve noticed recently an upward trend in people singing out loud on trains along to their ipods, regardless of the fact that their fellow commuters are either staring at them and tutting, or sniggering quietly behind their copy of the Evening Standard. It’s not surprising given the tendency of City workers to drown their sorrows before boarding the train back to the home counties and with more mobile music, it was bound to happen.

Last night’s performance was a classic though, not only the odd word being sung, but the full nine yards. Eyes shut, belting out a rambling drunken version of what sounds something like a combination between Blur, The Streets and Bob Dylan but with one of the most awful voices ever heard. The whole carriage falling about laughing, the commuter/singer totally oblivious, eyes still shut, finger pointing in the air and occasionally tapping on the table in front of him. Never mind karaoke, this is surely a new national sport. Is this is continuing influence of reality TV? Dave, we think you might know the answer, but can anyone think of a name for it?

The best of the rest…

If you haven’t read a transcript of this week’s treasury questions, never mind, but for *the record* this summary from Paul Waugh comes highly recommended.

H&K’s very own Candace Kuss has written an excellent article for CNN on her experience at this year’s Cannes Lions advertising festival.

And BIS published a consultation on consumer empowerment this week, which we think you might like to know about.

Have a good weekend.

Our Top 5 Business Columnists

As you might expect, our Financial & Professional Services team consume a truckload of traditional and new media every day on all things money. Despite the never-ending torrent, one thing we always make time for is to read the many excellent business columnists and commentators that try to make sense of everything going on.

We read a lot of these, and websites too, but which are our favourite business columnists?

With that in mind, here’s a list (in no particular order) of five of our favourites who appear in the business pages each week. This is by no means definitive, and indeed there are many others who we love to read as well – we’d welcome thoughts on your favourites too:

Anthony Hilton - one of our absolute must reads (Image from PRWeek.com)

1. Anthony Hilton, Evening Standard – A consistent hit in our team, Hilton has been providing commentary on the City for several decades. Never afraid to pull punches when it comes to analysing an issue, he always presents clear, concise, logic behind his arguments. Simply put, a must-read for us and thousands of others involved in financial services.

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FPS’ Friday Fiver

posted by Edward Jones

Nearly the weekend. First, here is this week’s Friday Fiver…

Thanks to DC, Daisy, Rachel and Nick for contributions.

Is the economy looking up?…

Economic figures this week were better than predicted, but is this just a pause for breath before the storm?

Here’s a question for you. If GDP growth is so flat (or even in reverse as it was last winter), then how can it be that unemployment fell according to the latest figures? Wednesday’s announcement from the ONS stated that total unemployment was down from 8% to 7.8%. Here’s another question for you as well. If global commodity price rises (particularly food and oil) are showing no sign of slowing down, then how can it be that inflation fell against most predictions according to the latest figures? The ONS’ figures on Tuesday recorded a drop in the Consumer Price Index from 4.4% in February to just 4.0% in March.

So what’s going on? Well, the fall in unemployment was definitely welcome, but it may be shortlived. The reason for this is the continued fear that new jobs created in the private sector may not be able to keep up with the large redundancies likely being made in the public sector as the government trims spending – it’s a bit like pouring water into a bucket at the top, and it flowing out through holes in the bottom; the problem is, we can’t pour water in fast enough.

And on inflation? Well, it turns out that we can thank retailers, and especially supermarkets, for the slight fall in inflation. According to the ONS, the level of discounting by shops is at an all time high as they try to maintain the flow of customers in through their doors (this might explain why my local Co-op has been running a 50% off wine promotion almost non-stop since Christmas). The question is, how long will these promotions continue to entice consumers? Especially when growth in wages continues to lag behind inflation, reducing the amount of disposable income we have to spend on the high street.

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